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Science

Chemistry reveals whether fingerprints came from a male or a female

The discovery of fresh fingerprints at a crime scene is a promising step towards determining the culprit, though huge databases still need to be sifted through in order to find potential matches and the culprit's prints need to be included in said databases. So what if many of the suspects could be ruled out before this rigorous search even begins? A new fingerprint identification technology is promising to lighten the load for investigators, by revealing whether prints belong to a male or female.Read More

Bicycles

Grasp Lock reads your fingerprint to unlock your bike

"Smart" bike locks may not quite be at the point where they're a dime a dozen, but there certainly are a number of them out there. That said, pretty much all of them require you to have your smartphone with you, and to make sure it's powered up when locking and unlocking. The Grasp Lock, however, is a little different. It utilizes a built-in fingerprint reader to recognize its user, so no phones, keys or combos are necessary.Read More

Science

New fingerprinting tech is more than skin-deep

Most fingerprint scanners work the same way – the pad of the finger is pressed against the scanner’s glass surface, light is shone through the glass onto it, and the light that’s reflected back by the minuscule valleys between the print’s ridges is used to create an image of the print. It’s a system that’s usually effective, although it can fail to read prints that have been flattened by age or damaged, plus it can be fooled by gelatine casts of fingerprints. That’s why scientists from the Paris-based Langevin Institute have developed a more reliable scanner, that looks below the skin's surface.Read More

Good Thinking

Glowing fingerprints to highlight criminals

Fingerprinting powders are still the go-to tool for investigators, both real and fictional. However, instead of oils, some fingerprints only leave a residue of amino acids and other compounds that fingerprinting powder doesn't adhere to very well. A new technique developed at Australia's CSIRO not only reveals fingerprints in cases where dusting won't, but makes them glow under UV light.Read More

Science

New tech could tell CSIs when fingerprints were made

A suspect says it on every forensics TV show ... "Of course my fingerprints were at their house, I delivered a package to them earlier this week!" Soon, though, that excuse may not be enough. Using a new technique, investigators could be better able to determine how many days ago fingerprints were left at a crime scene.Read More

Electronics

Synaptics aims to tighten security with self-contained fingerprint ID system

Attempts to move beyond password authentication look to have just received a nice little boost, with interface-specialists Synaptics announcing its new Match-in-Sensor, billed as the first self-contained fingerprint matching device. The solution promises new degrees of security by isolating the entire process from a host device like your phone or computer, minimizing the chances of somebody else getting their fingers on your prints.Read More

Science

3-D ultrasonic fingerprint scanning could strengthen smartphone security

Researchers at the University of California, Davis and Berkeley have managed to miniaturize low-depth ultrasound technology to create a fingerprint sensor that can scan your finger in 3D. This low-power technology, which could improve on the robustness of current-generation capacitive scanners, could soon find its way to our smartphones and tablets.Read More

Science

New test can detect cocaine use through a single fingerprint

A team led by researchers at the University of Surrey in the United Kingdom has developed a new, non-invasive test that's able to detect cocaine use in a patient by analyzing a single fingerprint. Unlike existing tests, the new technique is able to determine whether the subject has ingested the drug, rather than just touched it.Read More

Good Thinking

"Magic" marker helps investigators in hunt for fingerprints

A "magic" marker pen developed at the University of Leicester enables forensic experts, police and criminal investigators to quickly determine whether a receipt potentially containing fingerprint deposits is made of thermal paper, with another device then used to reveal the presence of any fingerprints. The devices come thanks to the work of the suitably-named Dr Bond, John Bond, from the University's Department of Criminology.Read More

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