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Explosives


— Electronics

GE RFID tech turns stickers into explosives detectors

By - February 24, 2015 2 Pictures
A global economy brings many benefits, but it also makes international terrorism extremely difficult to combat. With more goods passing through the world's shipping terminals and airports than ever before, hunting explosives with large, static detectors or teams of inspectors armed with detecting devices and reagents is a bottleneck that increases the chances of evasion. To help US counterterrorism efforts, GE has developed RFID stickers that act as wireless, battery-free explosives detectors that can be placed almost anywhere. Read More
— Science

Carbon nanotubes could find use in improved bomb detection device

By - November 10, 2014 2 Pictures
Along with flame-retardant clothing, flexible supercapitors and a stronger alternative to carbon fiber, carbon nanotubes may soon have yet another application. Led by Prof. Ling Zang, a team of researchers at the University of Utah has integrated the tiny tubes of carbon atoms into a prototype explosives sensor. It can also detect illegal drugs and toxic chemicals such as nerve gas, reportedly doing so better than currently-used technologies. Read More
— Good Thinking

Fighting fire with explosives

By - May 29, 2014
Building on a technique commonly used to extinguish oil well fires, Dr Graham Doig from the University of New South Wales' School of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering is examining whether explosives could be used to fight out-of-control forest and bushfires by blasting the flames out of treetops, slowing the fire and making it easier to fight on the ground. Read More
— Science

Sensors in sewers could locate bomb-makers

By - November 1, 2013
When people make improvised explosive devices (IEDs), many of the waste products end up simply going down the drain. With that in mind, the European Union-funded EMPHASIS consortium is now developing technology to track those chemicals within the waste stream, so that their point of origin can be located. Read More
— Science

Sandia Labs researcher develops fertilizer without the explosive potential

By - April 26, 2013
Ammonium nitrate is a commonly used fertilizer, but when mixed with a fuel such as diesel, it makes a powerful explosive – as seen in last week’s fertilizer plant explosion in Texas. But it's the deliberate use of the compound in improvised explosive devices (IEDs) and acts of terror such as the Oklahoma City bombing that gives rise to even greater cause for concern. This is why Kevin Fleming, an optical engineer at Sandia National Laboratories, developed a fertilizer alternative that isn’t detonable and therefore can’t be used in a bomb. Read More
— Wearable Electronics

Kaventsmann tests bomb-proof watch with C-4 explosives

By - March 25, 2013 23 Pictures
Smart watches may be poised to become the next "must-have" gadget for tech-enthusiasts, but we'll be surprised if rumored offerings from the likes of Samsung and Apple arrive with a build-quality to match the Triggerfish Bronze A2. This latest wristwatch from German designer Kaventsmann Uhren has been successfully tested at pressures up to 300 bar and has even survived a detonation of C-4 explosives with barely a scratch. Read More
— Marine

CSIRO sensor detects explosives at sea

By - November 15, 2012 4 Pictures
Clearing explosives is a major operation and removing the deadly residue of over a century of warfare is a never ending task. The problem is that before you can remove explosives you have to find them. That isn’t always easy – especially underwater, so Australia’s Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) has developed a new sensor that uses high-temperature planar gradiometers to seek out explosives in the sea. Read More
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