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Exercise

After taking a look at the Jet Blade hydroplaning watercraft last week, we were alerted to another senior design project from Calvin College, Michigan. A different group of students has designed and prototyped a device they're calling the TheraTryke. Aimed at those with MS, spinal cord injuries, or complete paraplegics, it lets riders use their hands, feet or a combination of both together to propel themselves forward.

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The Basis Peak is a wrist-worn fitness tracker which is jam-packed with sensors to monitor an array of information about your body and activity. It also automatically detects whether you're walking, running, cycling or sleeping, and can deliver smartphone notifications to your wrist. Gizmag recently spent a bit of time with the fitness tracker to see how well it performs, and how useful all of that information really is.

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People running outdoors speed up and slow down without thinking about it – it just happens. On a treadmill, however, they have to manually adjust the speed of the machine. Perhaps they won't have to for too longer, however. Scientists at The Ohio State University have developed a prototype treadmill that detects when its user's running speed changes, and adjusts its own speed accordingly. Read More
The Tickr X is a chest-worn fitness tracker from Wahoo Fitness which can be used to track a wide variety of fitness information including heart rate and motion analytics data, whether you are into running, cycling or working out at the gym. We recently spent a bit of time with the tracker to see whether it's worth strapping around your chest. Read More
Exercising in the dark is something that many of us are forced to do by our perpetually hectic lifestyles. However, that does inevitably mean encountering extra dangers en route, such as uneven pavements and impatient drivers. The 270-degree Shoe Lights from Night Runner are designed to allow you to exercise more safely at night. Read More
A new wearable suit called the Antelope uses muscle-targeting electrodes to increase the intensity of your gym workouts and other types of exercise. Wearable Life Science, the German startup behind the suit, says 20 minutes of exercise using the suit could be as effective and beneficial as three hours of activity without it. Read More
The Atlas wristband, a wearable that recognizes what activity you're doing to provide more useful fitness tracking data, has made the leap from crowdfunding success to the real world after raising over half a million dollars on Indiegogo last year. Gizmag spotted the Atlas at the Wearable Technology show in London this week. Read More
All manner of weird and wonderful exercise contraptions pushed on late night infomercials are testament to people's desire for faster and easier ways to get the benefits of exercise – whether said contraptions are effective or not. But now researchers have discovered a hormone that could provide some of the benefits of exercise, without working up a sweat doing stomach crunches or bicep curls. Read More
If you don't like cycling alone on a trainer all winter, you might be interested in Zwift or ebove. Both of these systems let indoor cyclists "virtually" ride on animated roads or trails, along with other cyclists who join them via the internet and appear as avatars. Perhaps, however, that computer-generated scenery just isn't cutting it for you. In that case, VeloReality’s VRide Multi may be more to your liking. It's similar to those other multi-player systems, but it uses actual HD first-person video shot on various scenic roads around the world. Read More
In some products, connected features seem forced. One place that they really make sense is in fitness, where the ability to track data can actually make a noticeable difference in performance. A new entry into that space is called Sophia, and it brings smart features to the humble skipping rope. Read More
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