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Ergonomic

Bicycles

Imprint Bicycle Grips take on the shape of the rider's hands

If you've ever been thundering along on your mountain bike and suddenly had one of your hands slip off the handlebar, you'll know just how "unsettling" it can be. The guys at UK-based TMR Designs certainly know, which is why they developed Imprint Bicycle Grips. Utilizing a proprietary material, they can be custom-molded to the size and shape of each of your hands.Read More

Mobile Technology

FrogPad2 to take the reins from iFrog one-handed keyboard

Anyone who uses the keypad of a smartphone is by definition a typist. A great many of those people, however, have never learned touch-typing. Therefore, they don't really need that low, wide QWERTY keyboard, do they? The folks at FrogPad realized that, when they first introduced their compact iFrog one-handed Bluetooth keyboard. Now they're about to release its successor, the FrogPad2. Read More

Active Chair works your core, but looks normal

Although there are differing opinions regarding the health benefits of using a fit ball as a seat, a lot of people swear by it. That said, they don't always do it, because using a big inflated rubber ball as an office chair just makes them feel a little too silly. That's why Hungarian company Balance King has created its normal-looking Active Chair. Read More

Bicycles

Spring-mounted BIUS1 bike pedals move to keep your joints happy

When we walk or run, our feet are able to land on the ground in whatever orientation makes life easiest for our hips, knees and ankles. When we're on a bike, however, our feet are at least somewhat held in place against the pedals. This can damage our leg joints, if they're forced to move in a stressful fashion. Germany's BioConform is now offering what it claims is a solution, in the form of its adaptable BIUS1 pedals.Read More

Bicycles

Morgaw bike saddle features integrated shock absorbers

Butt pain is a big complaint amongst cyclists, although many of them will tell you that getting a cushier seat isn't the solution. The theory goes that the extra padding will get pressed up into the rider's nether regions, ultimately just adding more pressure. Suspension seatposts are one alternative, although European cyclists Martin Moravcik and Slawek Gawlik have created what they claim is another, that's lighter and simpler – the Morgaw shock-absorbing saddle. Read More

Aircraft

Seymourpowell's Morph concept: Customizable airline seating for a price

Economy airline seats have a one-size-fits-all design that seems to fit hardly anybody and often makes flights of any length into an extended exercise in discomfort. Last week, London-based design firm Seymourpowell presented Morph – a new concept economy seat for airline travel that uses stretched fabric sheets and movable supports to allow passengers to customize their seats and even purchase extra width.Read More

Mobile Technology Review

Review: Grip & Shoot iPhone photography pistol grip

It was just a few months ago that we first saw the Grip & Shoot at CE Week in New York City. The device is a pistol grip attachment for the iPhone (4S and higher), allowing users to shoot stills and video one-handed, without having their fingers awkwardly splayed to reach the touchscreen controls. Its commercial launch has taken place since then, so I recently had the chance to try one out for myself.Read More

Bicycles

Infinity Seat may look minimal, but it's said to be comfy

Of all the complaints that cyclists have about cycling, butt pain/numbness has got to be the biggest. While it's become very common to see bike saddles with a cut-out section in the middle, that's more for relieving pressure specifically on the crotch area (you know what I'm talking about). California chiropractor and triathlete Vincent Marcel, however, has extended that cut-out to include almost the entire inside of the saddle. The result, his Infinity Seat, is said to be very easy on the bum indeed. Read More

Music

Steen launches Ergonomic Guitar line

Guitars like Gibson's iconic Flying V, just about any BC Rich model, or Bob Wiley's Ministar travel guitars may well stand out in any crowd, but they're not exactly built for comfort. Guitar maker Shawn Steen has spent the last two years tweaking and testing an instrument designed to comfortably fit the shape of a player's body, while looking good and sounding great. The final adjustments have been made, all the choice components selected, and the first show models created. Now it's launch time for the new line of hand-made ergonomic guitars. Read More

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