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Electronic

— Materials

New process could see "white graphene" pairing with graphene in ultra-thin electronics

Monolayer-thick sheets of hexagonal boron nitride, or "white graphene," share many of the properties of graphene, including exceptional mechanical strength and thermal conductivity. But one important point of difference is its electrical conductivity, with graphene being a conductor, while white graphene is an insulator. Now researchers have developed a process to create a virtually perfect monolayer of white graphene, making a dream team pairing of graphene and white graphene substrate for use in next generation electronic devices a possibility.

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— Materials

Scientists produce graphene 100 times cheaper than ever before

Since first being synthesized by Andre Geim and Kostya Novoselov at the University of Manchester in 2004, there has been an extensive effort to exploit the extraordinary properties of graphene. However the cost of graphene in comparison to more traditional electronic materials has meant that its uptake in electronic manufacturing has been slow. Now researchers at the University of Glasgow have discovered a way to create large sheets of graphene at a fraction of the cost of current methods.

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— Computers

All-optical permanent on-chip memory paves the way for faster, more efficient computers

A new non-volatile optical memory has been created by researchers working at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) and the universities of Münster, Oxford, and Exeter. Utilizing innovative phase-change materials to store information, the new device promises to significantly improve processing speeds by effectively eliminating the existing bottleneck of having to convert optical signals into electrical signals for storage and then back again for transmission.

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Fully-flexible touchscreen wristband slated for 2016 launch

Wearables, to be true to their name, should ideally be devices that are comfortable and easy to wear, like a snug scarf or a soft pair of socks. But many devices laying claim to the wearable tag don't quite meet this brief. The Wove Band could be an exception. Billed as the "world's first flexible touch display," the design combines a flexible E Ink display with a proprietary digital fabric developed by Chicago-based Polyera over a ten year period. Read More
— Military

DARPA sees future in vacuum tubes

In today's world, vacuum tubes or radio valves seem as dead as high button shoes and buggy whips, but DARPA sees them as very much the technology of the future. As part of a new program, the agency is looking to develop new tube designs and manufacturing techniques for use in tomorrow's high-powered communications and radar systems.

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