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Electronic

Electronics

Circuit Classics revive a golden age of electronics design

Aside from being a treasure trove of information for budding electronics engineers from the 1980s on, the down-to-earth style of Forrest M. Mims' Engineers' Notebook and Getting Started in Electronics series of books was a large part of their appeal. Now a crowdfunding project is looking to bring back some of that original charm by producing a limited set of working circuit boards in the Mims' style, replete with accompanying explanations and a wooden stand to display these electronic works of art.Read More

Materials

Coal-based electronics: A potential usurper to silicon's throne?

Graphene may be the poster child of thin film electronics, and silicon the current king of materials for semiconductors, but if scientists from MIT get their way, graphene's humble cousin, coal, could soon be giving them both a run for their money. For the first time, electronic devices have been created from thin films of coal and the research points to a range of uses that this cheap and abundant material could have in electronic devices, solar panels, and batteries.Read More

Electronics

World's smallest diode made from a single DNA molecule

As electronic devices become ever more complex, and the densities of components in those devices increases exponentially, we are rapidly approaching the day when the limitations of Moore's Law will be realized. In an effort to avert this eventuality, research has concentrated on moving away from traditional silicon technologies and into the realms of molecule-sized components and alternative materials. In this vein, researchers at the University of Georgia (UGA) and Ben-Gurion University in Israel have, for the first time, created a nanoscale electronic diode from a single DNA molecule.
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Materials

New process could see "white graphene" pairing with graphene in ultra-thin electronics

Monolayer-thick sheets of hexagonal boron nitride, or "white graphene," share many of the properties of graphene, including exceptional mechanical strength and thermal conductivity. But one important point of difference is its electrical conductivity, with graphene being a conductor, while white graphene is an insulator. Now researchers have developed a process to create a virtually perfect monolayer of white graphene, making a dream team pairing of graphene and white graphene substrate for use in next generation electronic devices a possibility.Read More

Electronics

Self-healing gel to repair and connect electronic circuits

Researchers at The University of Texas at Austin may have found a solution to one of the key problems holding back flexible, bendable electronics and soft robotics from mass production. Electronic circuits tend to crack and break when repeatedly subjected to bending or flexing, but a new self-healing gel may automatically repair these flaws as they develop.Read More

Materials

Scientists produce graphene 100 times cheaper than ever before

Since first being synthesized by Andre Geim and Kostya Novoselov at the University of Manchester in 2004, there has been an extensive effort to exploit the extraordinary properties of graphene. However the cost of graphene in comparison to more traditional electronic materials has meant that its uptake in electronic manufacturing has been slow. Now researchers at the University of Glasgow have discovered a way to create large sheets of graphene at a fraction of the cost of current methods.Read More

Do not open until 2957: MIT uncovers time capsule

A time capsule that's not to be opened until the year 2957 has been recovered on the MIT campus. Discovered by workers building the new MIT.nano building, it contains a letter to the people of the next millennium and historical artifacts, including an experimental electronic component that once gave the transistor a run for its money.Read More

Computers

All-optical permanent on-chip memory paves the way for faster, more efficient computers

A new non-volatile optical memory has been created by researchers working at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) and the universities of M√ľnster, Oxford, and Exeter. Utilizing innovative phase-change materials to store information, the new device promises to significantly improve processing speeds by effectively eliminating the existing bottleneck of having to convert optical signals into electrical signals for storage and then back again for transmission.Read More

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