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— Military

Exelis tests versatile new airborne sensor for explosives and dangerous chemicals

Hyperspectral imaging is a bit like super-vision. With it, you can not only see what’s there, but what it’s made of, which is a good thing if you’re looking for bombs, gas leaks, and smuggled nuclear material. Defense and information systems specialist Exelis has announced the successful test of a new airborne long-wave infrared (LWIR), hyperspectral (HSI) sensor that can be aimed in multiple directions and is capable of detecting explosives, gases and dangerous chemicals. Read More
— Around The Home

La Fenice coffee machine first to use electromagnetic induction heating

A team of young Italian coffee aficionados has come up with a new concept for a coffee machine, which they claim to be the world's first electromagnetic induction coffee maker. Dubbed "La Fenice," the fully functional prototype makes both traditional Italian espresso and American filter coffee and uses up to 80 percent less energy than most other coffee machines. Read More
— Mobile Technology

Lunecase harvests electromagnetic energy from iPhone to power LED alerts

Smartphone cases are so common that you can pick one up at the supermarket checkout stand, so for one to stand out, it needs something more than a print of a cartoon kitten. Built by Concepter, a company based in Kiev, Ukraine, the Lunecase is s a batteryless, wireless phone case that not only interacts with an iPhone, but also powers itself from the electromagnetic radiation emitted by the device. Read More
— Electronics

BAE Systems develops a flat lens that acts like it's curved

Anyone who’s ever needed a pair of thick eyeglasses has a firm idea that lenses are the one thing where form follows function. However, BAE Systems and Queen Mary’s School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science in London have put paid to that idea with a flat lens that works like a conventional curved lens, yet without any reduction in bandwidth performance. Using a combination of composite metamaterials and transformational optics for the first time, they have created a lens that's able to bend electromagnetic waves, yet isn't bound by its shape for its function. Read More
— Health and Wellbeing

Cefaly migraine prevention headband gets FDA approval

Though using electrical stimulation of the brain as a means of treating migraines has provided an alternative to over-the-counter medication, the administering of the electrical currents can be complex, involving bulky equipment or even surgically implanted electrodes. Cefaly, a battery-operated headband, has now been approved by FDA (US Food and Drug Administration) and is said to not only treat migraines, but possibly prevent them altogether. Read More
— Space

Electromagnetic Levitator headed to ISS for future materials research

Astronauts, get your welding goggles on – the space station is going into the foundry business. The International Space Station is set to do a spot of industrial research this June, when ESA’s Materials Science Laboratory-Electromagnetic Levitator heads for the station aboard Europe's’ ATV-5 Georges Lemaître unmanned space freighter as part of a program to study the casting of alloys in a weightless environment. Read More
— Mobile Technology

AllSee prototype puts gesture recognition in your pocket

Current gesture recognition technology seen in devices such as Samsung's Galaxy S4 generally rely on the device's camera. This not only creates a drain on the device's battery, but means users need to retrieve the phone from their pocket or handbag to make use of the technology. The new AllSee system developed at the University of Washington (UW) overcomes both these problems by using wireless signals not only as a power source, but also to detect user gestures when the phone is tucked away out of sight. Read More
— 3D Printing

MakeVR brings motion control to 3D modeling

Though 3D printers themselves are becoming more affordable, the complexities of 3D modeling software have also proven a hurdle to entry to the consumer market. While some companies have sought to enhance their mainstream appeal with catalogs of pre-designed printable objects, others are taking a more hands-on approach. Virtual reality firm Sixense, which this week announced its motion controlled solution for 3D modeling called MakeVR, hopes to make the design process more intuitive and appealing for the average user. Read More