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Electric Vehicles

— Urban Transport

Grenoble embraces last-mile EV sharing scheme

By - July 2, 2014 24 Pictures
Solving the problem of urban transportation has vexed town planners since the days of Julius Caesar. It isn't just a matter of coming up with a better bus or shared cars. Unless you want people to end up slogging the last mile of their journey in the rain, a city’s transportation system needs to be comprehensive and integrated. The French city of Grenoble is taking a stab at the problem by introducing Toyota's Ha:mo (Harmonious Mobility) system into its broader transport management scheme. Read More

Nissan e-NV-200 launched in Japan

In October this year, Nissan will enter the commercial zero-emissions vehicle market when its e-NV200 van goes on sale in Japan. The company officially introduced the vehicle during a launch display event at Nissan HQ in Yokohama, earlier this month. Gizmag dropped in for a closer look. Read More
— Automotive

TOSA electric buses use computer models to control costs

By - June 19, 2014 3 Pictures
It’s one thing to invent an electric bus, a hydrogen car, or other green transportation technology, but quite another for it to work in the real world. For example, the Trolleybus Optimisation Système Alimentation (TOSA) flash-charging electric bus system may be the most brilliant idea ever, but if it can’t stay in the black, then might as well be drawn by diesel-powered horses. Scientists at the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) are hoping to avoid that scenario by developing a computer model that helps engineers integrate the buses into existing transport systems while keeping costs down. Read More
— Aircraft

GF7 car design could legally hit 550 mph – in the sky

Greg Brown and Dave Fawcett are working on an design that they hope will yield something we've spent decades waiting for – a flying jet-propelled car. A sleek cross between a business jet with a luxury automobile, the GF7 drives on electric motors while on the ground, then can extend wings and use a 3,500-lb thrust jet engine to fly to 38,000 ft (12,000 m) and speeds of 550 mph (885 km/h). The (obvious) catch: if this ambitious project does get of the ground, it won't come cheap. Read More
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