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Earbuds


— Music

Music Wrap moves Bluetooth headphones from your ears to your neck

Music Wrap is a new crowdfunding project with the aim of changing the way we listen to music, by eliminating earbuds and headphones in favor of its M25 headphone/speaker hybrid. The device sits around your neck, and creates what the company (perhaps a bit hyperbolically) calls a "personal sound field." Flexible, water-resistant, anti-shock and dust proof, the M25 is designed to free users' hands and ears while delivering a listening experience that will lessen the chance of damaging their eardrums.

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— Wearable Electronics Review

Here Active Listening review: Augmenting your world with a pair of earbuds

If you could buy a pair of augmented reality glasses that made the world around you appear to get bigger or smaller, change colors, have glowing psychedelic trails, or make individual objects transparent ... well, that would be an AR product straight out of a sci-fi novel, far beyond anything we've ever seen. Now imagine that same product, only instead of sight it relied on your sense of hearing. Join Gizmag as we review Here Active Listening earbuds, which give you the power to fine-tune (or trip out) your ears' experience of the world.

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— Music

SenCbuds earbuds know when to stop the music

If you're listening to music from your smartphone via earbuds, there are currently two ways of pausing the playback: you can hit pause on the phone, or use the button controls on the earbud cable. New Zealand-based Vivnnovation Limited, however, has come up with a third alternative. Its SenCbuds automatically pause your music when they're removed from your ears, then resume it when you put them back in.

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— Music Review

Review: Second coming of the q-Jays earphones

In a market saturated with celebrity endorsements, fashion experiments and ambitious mark-ups, it is always a delight to discover a product that focusses on functionality and performance. Swedish company Jays last month released its second-generation q-Jays reference earphones, three years after the release of the first model. We put them through their paces to see if they impress as much as the originals.

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— Music Review

Review: Trinity Audio Engineering Delta in-ear monitors

When it comes to high-end audio, many options out there tend to bring along a high-end cost. While price may not be much of an issue for audiophiles or audio enthusiasts, the average consumer probably doesn’t want to shell out hundreds upon hundreds for some headphones or earbuds. But Trinity Audio Engineering is aiming to provide quality sound without the steep premium. We get some ears-in with the Trinity Audio Delta in-ear monitors (IEMs) to see if the company delivers on its vision.

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— Music

Trinity Audio in-ear monitors feature sweat-proof coating, customizable sound

When it comes to most crowdfunded campaigns, backers hope that their pledges successfully produce and ship the product(s) designed by the creators. But everyone once in a great while, you'll find a project that is tailor-made to the requests of consumers. Trinity Audio Engineering has just launched a fresh Kickstarter campaign to create high-end in-ear monitors (IEMs) for active individuals, all because of the collective comments and feedback during its previous success.

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— Wearable Electronics

Here Active Listening earbuds: Audio adjustment for the real world

We've already heard about electronic earplugs that only block sound when loud noises occur, or that amplify human voices. Doppler Labs' Here Active Listening system, however, takes things a step further. Consisting of an app-controlled pair of wireless earbuds, it lets users filter out or enhance audio frequencies in real-world ambient sound before it reaches their ears.

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— Mobile Technology

Earity wireless earbuds feature a little voice control

Let's be honest, if we put the ability to carry audio from a device to our ears to one side, headphone cords are nothing but trouble. When they aren't balled up in a tangled mess, they're catching on objects and yanking the buds out of our ears. While various wireless earphones have emerged to tackle this problem, the team behind Earity is looking to take this convenience one step further with a pair of earbuds that respond to voice commands. Read More
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