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E-reader

Mobile Technology

Amazon announces the 2nd-generation Kindle Paperwhite

It's no surprise to see new Amazon Kindles launching around this time of year. What is surprising is that the company would announce the newest version of its frontlit eReader without any event or fanfare. You can probably chalk that up to today's accidental publication of the device's landing page, followed by a "hell, let's just make it official" decision. Either way, we now have the official scoop on Amazon's 2013 update to the Kindle Paperwhite.Read More

Mobile Technology

Barnes & Noble to continue making Nook tablets after all

Amazon gets a lot of credit for starting the budget tablet craze with the original Kindle Fire. But it was actually Barnes & Noble that released the first subsidized, affordable, 7-inch slate, in the form of 2010's Nook Color. The three generations of B&N's Nook tablets may have been limited by their software, but they also delivered solid hardware and good overall bang for your buck. So we weren't complaining today, when B&N announced that it won't be discontinuing its color Nook tablets after all.Read More

Mobile Technology

Sony unveils 13.3-inch e-reader destined for students

Most popular e-readers available today tend to be based around a 6-inch screen. Though you can read technical manuals, textbooks (with graphics and tables), comic strips or electronic magazines on these devices, the roughly paperback-sized display does tend to feel just a little cramped. The Kno double-screened digital textbook offered hope of bigger display real estate a few years back, but dedicated hardware was abandoned in favor of a multi-device app. Together with E Ink Holdings, Sony has developed a new flexible electronic paper display technology called Mobius, that will make its debut in a new 13.3-inch Reader prototype at EDIX 2013 in Tokyo between May 15 and 17. Read More

Science

San Antonio to open first bookless public library

A new library to be opened in Bexar County, Texas, will provide visitors with a bank of e-Readers for borrowing e-books ... but books of the traditional paper variety will be glaringly absent. The project marks the first public library to be built as an all-digital service and just to make sure library-goers are in no doubt that it's the 21st century, the interior will feature a design influenced by Apple retail stores. Read More

Mobile Technology

Kindle Paperwhite vs. Nook Simple Touch with GlowLight

While Apple dominates the tablet market with its iPad, there are two big names competing for your dollars in the dedicated e-book realm: Amazon's Kindle and Barnes & Noble's Nook. Both have been around for several generations, and have closely followed each others' footsteps. This year both product lines saw a long-anticipated upgrade: backlit displays. This tech allows for easier reading in low-lit conditions, which was long the Achilles heel of e-readers. So how do Amazon's Kindle Paperwhite and Barnes & Noble's Nook Simple Touch with GlowLight stack up?Read More

Mobile Technology

Amazon announces Kindle Paperwhite e-reader

Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos took to the stage today in Santa Monica to reveal several new devices, including an all-new Kindle e-reader, dubbed the “Kindle Paperwhite." The e-reader sports several upgrades over other Kindle models, such as a new built-in illumination system, capacitive touchscreen and significantly improved screen resolution. Read More

Mobile Technology

Sony launches new touch-enabled E-Ink PRS-T2 Reader

Sony says that its new 6-inch touchscreen e-Reader benefits from more paper-like page turns, an E-Ink display that's been optimized for long-term, ad-free reading and a splattering of social features. The Sony Reader PRS-T2 also comes with 2GB of onboard storage (with about 1.3GB available for use after initial setup) and microSD media card expansion and includes the company's public library lending feature allows library card holders to wirelessly borrow free e-books from over 15,000 public libraries in the U.S.Read More

Computers

Nook for Web brings Nook books to Web browsers

Barnes & Noble has introduced Nook for Web, which lets users access new digital content as well as their previously purchased eBooks on all PC and Mac-supported Web browsers. No sign-in or software download is required for Nook for Web, which is hosted on Barnes and Noble's library sites. Now readers without a Nook eReader can browse, sample, or purchase the millions of titles in Barnes & Noble's range.Read More

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