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Driving

— Automotive

Brain4Cars system could spot driver errors before they happen

We keep hearing about systems designed to either alert drivers to impending collisions, to let them know that they've made a mistake (such as drifting out of their lane), or to tell them that they're getting tired. Brain4Cars, however, takes yet another approach. Created by scientists at Cornell and Stanford universities, it monitors drivers to determine when they're about to do something wrong, so it can warn them not to. Read More
— Automotive

Ford's new technology chief ponders the future of driving and mobility

Global trends appear to be moving towards a future where in many markets, car ownership may look like an expensive, impractical and inconvenient way to get around. So what's the next model of personal transport, and where do the big automakers fit in? Ford's new global VP of Research and Advanced Engineering, Ken Washington, sat down in Melbourne for a "crystal ball" discussion about autonomous cars, on-demand vehicles, car sharing, smart parking, multi-mode transport, and how a car company might learn to cater to a new generation of customers that are far more interested in upgrading their phones than getting their driver's licenses. Read More
— Wearables

Impecca Alert Band monitors brainwaves to detect driver tiredness

When drowsiness sets in on the road, drivers typically open a window and turn up the radio. We've also seen a number of alert systems introduced over the years, including the EyeAlert Driver Fatigue Monitor, which tracks the eye-closure rate of drivers, and Audi has researched putting heart-rate monitors in car seats. The Impecca Alert Band takes a different approach. It monitors brain activity and warns drivers that they are becoming fatigued in advance of it becoming dangerous, giving users more time to do the one thing that helps: stop and take a break. Read More
— Children

buckle me up lets parents know if kids undo their seatbelts

Most parents are fairly diligent about making sure that their young children buckle up at the start of car trips. Unfortunately, due to the fact that many cars don't have rear seatbelt warning systems, they may not realize that their kids have released their belt while en route. Needless to say, the outcome of an accident under such circumstances could be tragic. That's why an Australian startup has launched buckle me up, a system that wirelessly adds a rear seatbelt warning system to cars that don't already have one. Read More
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