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Driving

The Siemens RACE prototype will allow hardware components to be updated via a plug-and-pla...

Siemens is developing new technology aimed at transforming electric cars into "rolling computers" controlled by a centralized computing architecture. According to Siemens, not only will it be possible to retrofit functions such as electrical brakes using a plug-and-play process (like on home PCs) but developers will also be able to push new software functions and updates out to vehicles – just like how it's currently done with smartphones.  Read More

Razor's Crazy Cart: available August 1 in the UK

When the Crazy Cart first launched in the USA, Canada and Australia last year, it made a huge splash. Not just for its awesome sideways drifting action, but because it featured quite frankly the best promotional video we've ever seen. Now, Razor has announced that its "ultimate drift machine" is available in the UK from August 1.  Read More

Working on HARKEN in the lab – the finished version wouldn't include the extra chest strap...

It was just last week that we heard about how researchers from Nottingham Trent University are looking at embedding heart rate sensors in car seats, to detect when drivers are nodding off. Well, it turns out that they're not the only ones. A consortium of European companies and institutes is developing a similar system known as HARKEN, which uses seat-located sensors to monitor both the driver's heart rate and their rate of respiration.  Read More

Sensors right in car seat textile could be used to monitor heart rate and detect when a dr...

Falling asleep at the wheel is extremely dangerous both for the driver, and for others sharing the road with them. A team of researchers at Nottingham Trent University are working on a solution to this driving threat. They're doing it with sensors in a car seat that detect the driver's heart rate, and alert the driver if they start dozing off.  Read More

BMW Korea Driving Center bird's eye view

BMW has invested some US$75.5 million building the ultimate test drive center in Incheon, near Seoul, South Korea. Customers can stretch the legs of BMW's range of performance cars and motorcycles on a 2.6-kilometer (1.6-mile) closed circuit racetrack, or put an SUV through its paces on an off road area. The 240,000-square meter (almost 60 acre) site will also house a service center, bars and restaurants, training academy, historical exhibits, kids' area – and of course, a giant BMW and MINI showroom.  Read More

In the two hours of driving about the Bolognese countryside, the Huracán showed itself to ...

Having seen the sumptuous collection of angles and curves that is the Lamborghini Huracán in person during its North American debut a few months back, I can attest to its visual impact, so I was just slightly pleased to learn I’d be driving the 610 hp specimen out of Lamborghini’s headquarters in Sant’Agata this month. So what's it like to drive the new baby bull?  Read More

The RoofScope mounts on the hood, and is viewed from the driver's seat

If you carry a boat, bicycle or pretty anything else on the roof of your car, you probably spend a lot of time wondering if it's still securely in place up there while you're driving. The problem is, there's no way of seeing it without stopping and getting out of the car ... unless you have a RoofScope, that is.  Read More

Scientists have used lasers to gauge the alcohol vapor content of the air in moving cars  ...

It used to be that the only way you could get a speeding ticket was if a police officer personally witnessed your overly-fast driving. Then photo radar came along. Well, when it comes to drunk driving, lasers could soon be the equivalent of photo radar. Polish researchers at the Military University of Technology in Warsaw have demonstrated how the high-intensity beams of light can be used to detect the presence of alcohol – even exhaled alcohol – in passing vehicles.  Read More

This Corvette C7 Stingray is different than most in that its driver is quadriplegic and is...

What might it take to put a former Indy Racecar League driver back in the driver’s seat after a racing accident renders him quadriplegic? Perhaps a customized Corvette C7 Stingray, decked out by military and industry engineers to allow Sam Schmidt, now an owner of his own Indy team, to take back the metaphorical wheel.  Read More

Gizmag feature writer Loz Blain headed for the wall at Monaco

Like a video game arcade on steroids, Motionators offers drivers the chance to experience the thrill of Formula 1 racing in a giant, lurching motion rig that simulates bumps, acceleration, deceleration and cornering G-forces – and crashes; very physical crashes, as the rather pedestrian Gizmag Race Team discovered. Thankfully we had budding US F2000 racer Scott Andrews on hand, who holds every lap record at the facility, to show us the way around Monaco.  Read More

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