Photokina 2014 highlights

Driving

Audi announced it will be the first auto manufacturer to receive an autonomous driving per...

Audi has announced that it will be the first auto manufacturer to receive an autonomous driving permit from the State of California. The new autonomous vehicle laws that went into effect yesterday require the German automaker to submit a surety of bond of at least US$5 million per vehicle in order to qualify.  Read More

Honda's booth at the ITS World Congress

Honda took the occasion of the 2014 ITS World Congress in Detroit to show off some of the company’s latest accomplishments in the field of intelligent transportation. The technologies on display are part of Honda’s goal of a "collision-free society" and "safety for everyone" through assisted driving systems that protect not only the car’s occupants, but pedestrians, cyclists, and others on the road.  Read More

The system prototype, mounted on the hood of a truck

A couple of years ago we heard about an experimental headlight system being developed at Carnegie Mellon University, that allows drivers to see through rain and snow more easily. It does so by selectively not illuminating individual raindrops and snowflakes. Now, thanks to recent road tests on the streets of Pittsburgh, its creators have confirmed that it can also be used to keep oncoming drivers from being blinded by your high beams.  Read More

Watching the fun at AstaZero

It seems like hardly a week goes by without our hearing about another automated safety feature for cars. Such technologies include systems that detect when drivers are getting tired, that allow multiple cars to safely travel together in speed-controlled "convoys," or that warn drivers when they're drifting out of their lane. Now, in order to help foster the development of more such concepts, a new Swedish test-track facility has begun operations.  Read More

Pure electrics like the Renault Zoe will take part in the 2014 MPG Marathon

The MPG Marathon, now in its fourth year, aims to demonstrate how fuel-efficient cars, route planning technology and eco-friendly driving skills can help to manage the rising cost of fuel. This year, electric vehicles, alongside range extenders and plug-in hybrids, will take part for the first time in its history.  Read More

An autonomous car being tested in the UK

Driverless cars are an exciting glimpse of the future, with great potential to improve road safety. It seems the UK has caught on to this, announcing a £10 million (US$17 million) scheme to test driverless cars on public roads from January 2015.  Read More

The Siemens RACE prototype will allow hardware components to be updated via a plug-and-pla...

Siemens is developing new technology aimed at transforming electric cars into "rolling computers" controlled by a centralized computing architecture. According to Siemens, not only will it be possible to retrofit functions such as electrical brakes using a plug-and-play process (like on home PCs) but developers will also be able to push new software functions and updates out to vehicles – just like how it's currently done with smartphones.  Read More

Razor's Crazy Cart: available August 1 in the UK

When the Crazy Cart first launched in the USA, Canada and Australia last year, it made a huge splash. Not just for its awesome sideways drifting action, but because it featured quite frankly the best promotional video we've ever seen. Now, Razor has announced that its "ultimate drift machine" is available in the UK from August 1.  Read More

Working on HARKEN in the lab – the finished version wouldn't include the extra chest strap...

It was just last week that we heard about how researchers from Nottingham Trent University are looking at embedding heart rate sensors in car seats, to detect when drivers are nodding off. Well, it turns out that they're not the only ones. A consortium of European companies and institutes is developing a similar system known as HARKEN, which uses seat-located sensors to monitor both the driver's heart rate and their rate of respiration.  Read More

Sensors right in car seat textile could be used to monitor heart rate and detect when a dr...

Falling asleep at the wheel is extremely dangerous both for the driver, and for others sharing the road with them. A team of researchers at Nottingham Trent University are working on a solution to this driving threat. They're doing it with sensors in a car seat that detect the driver's heart rate, and alert the driver if they start dozing off.  Read More

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