Advertisement
more top stories »

Drexel University

— Medical

3D-printed living tumors make a better model for cancer research

By - April 28, 2014 2 Pictures
Medical research is only as good as the model, whether you’re using one animal to stand in for another, or creating in vitro replicas of tissue and organs. A research lab at Drexel University specializing in biofabrication recently used 3D printing to create models of tumor tissue that more closely replicate real tumors than traditional 2D tissue culture. Appropriating tools in this manner could lead to a better understanding of how tumors grow, and importantly, how they die. Read More
— Health and Wellbeing

Ultrasound-emitting "band-aids" speed healing of venous ulcers

By - August 7, 2013 1 Picture
Venous ulcers are nasty things, often found on the lower extremities of elderly or inactive people. They occur when high blood pressure causes the skin adjacent to the affected veins to break down, leaving open wounds that take months or even years to heal. Standard treatments include compression bandages, infection control and standard wound dressings, although these approaches don’t work in all cases. Now, however, scientists are getting good results using band-aid-like patches that emit ultrasound into the ulcers. Read More
— Robotics

DRC-HUBO revealed for DARPA Robotics Challenge

By - July 12, 2013 11 Pictures
The DARPA Robotics Challenge (DRC) has scheduled its first physical trial for late December, leaving competing teams less than six months to finish building and programming their robots. In case you're just tuning in, the DRC is a gauntlet of daunting tasks designed to test robots that may someday stand in for people as first responders. DARPA has just revealed the completed ATLAS humanoid, but there's still a half dozen others that remain somewhat mysterious. Now, Team DRC-HUBO is spilling the beans on its own humanoid robot. Read More
— Aircraft

Drexel University giving UAVs a hand (and arms)

By - August 7, 2012 2 Pictures
UAVs have proven very successful as surveillance, intelligence-gathering and mapping craft, but their ability to interact with the ground has been largely confined to launching missiles. Now, Drexel University in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania is planning to endow them with arms and hands to allow them to work on such tasks as repairing infrastructure and disaster recovery while hovering near the ground. Read More
— Automotive

Disco ball-like side mirror for cars eliminates blind spots, without the fish-eye effect

By - June 8, 2012 2 Pictures
While there are already various anti-blind-spot automobile mirrors on the market, these all tend to incorporate a very curved surface that drastically distorts the appearance of objects seen in them – given that drivers use their mirrors to avoid getting in accidents, it’s kind of important that those mirrors show the surrounding traffic as it really is. That’s why Dr. Andrew Hicks, a mathematics professor at Philadelphia’s Drexel University, has created a side mirror that eliminates the blind spot, while causing almost no distortion. Read More
— Good Thinking

3D printed fossil replicas used to build robotic dinosaurs

By - March 5, 2012 1 Picture
Although it may seem that we know a great deal about dinosaurs, a lot of the knowledge is actually based on assumptions rather than hard facts. Often, scientists have to resort to guesswork. Some hypotheses can only be tested by manipulating a skeleton model, but that's quite a challenge if the bones you want to study belonged to an enormous animal. Also, size is not the only issue. Dinosaur fossils tend to be fragile, unique and valuable. That's why the researchers at Drexel University, who want to build precise robotic models of dinosaurs, decided to use 3D printing technology. Read More
— Science

Cold plasma used to kill bacteria on raw chicken

By - February 7, 2012 2 Pictures
Judging by the number of folks who fall prey to food-borne illness each year, food safety is serious business, especially when you consider that pathogens such as Campylobacter and Salmonella contaminate over 70 percent of the raw chicken meat tested. Now, recent research from a food safety team at Pennsylvania's Drexel University offers proof-of-concept for what may one day be a common approach to preventing food-borne illness from raw poultry and meat products - the use of high-energy, low temperature plasma to eliminate unwanted bacteria while leaving the food basically unchanged. Read More
Advertisement

Subscribe to Gizmag's email newsletter

Advertisement