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Diabetes

— Health and Wellbeing

New diabetes treatment would turn liver cells into insulin-producers

By - August 25, 2014 1 Picture
When pancreatic islet allo-transplantation therapy was first introduced, it provided hope for countless diabetics tired of daily insulin injections. While the technology has delivered on much of its promise, Tel Aviv-based regenerative medicine firm Orgenesis is currently developing a treatment of its own, that it claims addresses much of the shortcomings of islet therapy. In a nutshell, its approach involves converting the patient’s own liver cells into cells that produce insulin. Read More
— Medical

Single injection reverses type 2 diabetes symptoms in mice without side effects

By - August 6, 2014 1 Picture
There are numerous research efforts underway to develop new treatments and improve the lives of people suffering type 2 diabetes, whose ranks have increased dramatically in recent decades due in large part to the so-called obesity epidemic. A new generation of safer and more effective diabetes drugs could be in the offing with researchers at the Salk Institute discovering that when mice with diet-induced diabetes were given a single injection of a protein, their blood sugar levels were restored to a healthy range for more than two days. Read More
— Medical

Wearable pupillometer could detect dangerous diabetic condition earlier

By - July 29, 2014 2 Pictures
Diabetic autonomic neuropathy is a condition that can occur in both type 1 and type 2 diabetics, compromising the autonomic nerves that control the gastrointestinal system, the heart and other vital organs. Among other things, it can cause arrhythmias, fainting, incontinence and an increased risk of bacterial infections. Thanks to a device being developed in Taiwan, however, it may soon be possible to detect the condition earlier, thus limiting its effects. Read More
— Medical

New microchip promises to streamline and simplify diabetes diagnoses

By - July 21, 2014 1 Picture
For people who don't already know, here's the difference between type 1 and type 2 diabetes: the body produces little or no insulin in the case of type 1, and isn't able to utilize the insulin that it does produce in type 2. It's a significant difference, so it's important that patients are diagnosed correctly. Thanks to a new microchip developed by a team at Stanford University led by Dr. Brian Feldman, doing so could soon be quicker, cheaper and easier than ever before. Read More
— Health and Wellbeing

Changes in ambient temperature found to influence brown fat levels

By - July 1, 2014 1 Picture
The discovery that lowering your body temperature leads to an increase in a certain type of "good" fat might have some ditching the diet books and shedding a layer of clothing instead. A study conducted at the National Institute of Health (NIH) in Washington has demonstrated that changes in ambient temperature affects brown fat levels in humans, pointing to potential treatment options for the weight-wary and sufferers of diabetes. Read More
— Medical

Device for detecting glucose levels in saliva comes a step closer

By - June 18, 2014 1 Picture
Two years ago, we first heard about how scientists at Rhode Island's Brown University were developing a biochip for detecting very low concentrations of glucose in saliva. Such a device could make life much easier for diabetics, as it would save them from having to perform fingerprick blood tests. At the time, it was limited to detecting glucose in water. Now, however, it's able to do so within a mixture of water, salts and select enzymes – also known as artificial saliva. Read More
— Medical

Bionic pancreas could be life-changing for diabetics

By - February 20, 2014 1 Picture
For people living with type 1 diabetes, a constant process of monitoring and adjusting blood sugar levels is required. A change may be on the horizon, though. A bionic pancreas trialled among 30 adults has been very well-received by the participants, and has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for three transitional outpatient studies over the next 18 months. Read More
— Health and Wellbeing

Producing insulin-secreting pancreas cells from skin cells gives hope to diabetics

By - February 6, 2014 1 Picture
Type 1 diabetics suffer from a lack of beta cells in the pancreas, which are responsible for insulin production. Although glucose monitoring and insulin injections allows the disease to be managed, finding a way to replenish these beta cells would offer a more permanent solution. Scientists at Gladstone Institutes in San Francisco have provided hope for just such a treatment by developing a technique to reprogram skin cells into insulin-producing beta cells. Read More
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