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Diabetes

Medical

Non-invasive device monitors diabetes using microwaves

For diabetics, keeping track of blood sugar can be a drag, with Type 1 sufferers having to monitor their levels as much as six times a day. A new device might make life significantly easier, providing a non-invasive solution for tracking glucose levels, without the need to extract blood.Read More

Medical

Creation of insulin-releasing cells in a dish offers hope of diabetes therapy

A molecular switch could hold the key to a personalized cell replacement therapy for diabetes. Both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes are characterized by an inability to produce (or process) insulin, which is required to regulate blood sugar levels. This has been linked to malfunctioning or failing beta cells in the pancreas, but so far scientists have struggled to produce effective replacement cells in the lab. Now a team at Salk Institute believes the problem has been solved.Read More

Medical

Looking to love handles to treat diabetes

If a patient has Type 1 diabetes, then their ability to produce insulin is inhibited, usually by a loss of beta cells in the pancreas. Researchers have been looking at ways to replace the lost population of cells, but the process is difficult, often requiring the patient's immune system to be suppressed in order to be effective. Now, researchers at ETH Zurich have made a big breakthrough, successfully creating functional beta cells using stem cells extracted from the fatty tissue of a 50 year-old patient.Read More

Medical

Improved understanding of genetics offers new hope for diabetics

Diabetes is a widespread health problem, affecting some 400 million people across the planet. With that number only set to rise, it's important that we find new treatments as quickly as possible. Researchers at the University of Montreal are making significant progress in that regard, discovering a common genetic defect in beta cells that may be a big factor in both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes.Read More

Medical

Sweat-monitoring patch releases diabetes drugs when required

Unlocking the secrets that sweat contains about our bodies could come to offer all kinds of exciting ways to maintain our physical well-being. From glucose to sodium, tracking of key chemicals in this bodily fluid could make for new, non-invasive ways to keep tabs on harmful conditions. The latest effort to tap into this assortment of physiological information comes in the form of a sweat-monitoring patch that records glucose in a subject and even releases diabetes drugs into the bloodstream to keep its levels in check.Read More

Medical

Smart diabetes patch gets smarter

Implanting beta cells has been a promising, yet problematic approach to treating diabetes. These cells live in the pancreas and, in healthy people, secrete vital insulin to regulate blood sugar levels. But in sufferers of diabetes they don't quite work as required. Building on previous work on a smart insulin patch, scientists have now discovered a way of delivering the effects of these cells in a way that overcomes some of the complications. Read More

Health & Wellbeing

Natural plant pigment makes for diabetic-friendly bread

Good for news for people with diabetes, and it's edible, too. Scientists at the National University of Singapore have created a bread with anthocyanin, a plant pigment that helps slow digestion, which helps the body keep glucose levels in the blood under control. The team hopes it will help pave the way for a new market of healthier food products for people who have to manage their diabetes.Read More

Medical

Insulin-producing mini stomachs promise patient-specific diabetes treatment

Patients with Type 1 diabetes suffer from an absence of pancreatic cells called beta cells, which are responsible for producing insulin. Researchers have been trying to tackle the deficiency for decades, but now it seems that significant progress may have been made – a team of scientists lead by researchers from the Harvard Stem Cell Institute have discovered that it might be possible to engineer tissue from the lower stomach to address patients' insulin needs.Read More

Medical

Laser-based blood glucose monitor promises a less prickly way to keep diabetes in check

For a number of years now, various research groups have been examining the potential for lasers applied to the skin to measure blood-glucose levels in an effort to put an end to the daily finger-pricks and meticulous blood sampling performed by diabetics. Japanese scientists have now developed one such system that differs from previous techniques by relying on far infrared light, which the researchers say is harmless and offers unprecedented levels of accuracy.
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