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Detection


— Health and Wellbeing

Thumb ring diagnoses sexually-transmitted diseases

By - August 21, 2015 2 Pictures

Although most people with multiple sexual partners know that being checked for STDs is the responsible thing to do, many don’t do so because of the stigma associated with going to the clinic. That’s why a Silicon Valley-based startup has developed the Hoope ring. It’s worn on the thumb, and can reportedly diagnose diseases such as syphilis, gonorrhoea, chlamydia and trichomoniasis in less than a minute.

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London to trial cyclist detect systems at traffic lights

In what it calls a "world first," Transport for London (TfL) will trial cyclist detection systems at traffic lights in the city with a view to improving cycle-flow. The technology aims to detect the number of cyclists travelling along a route. It then adjusts traffic signal timings to give cyclists more time on green lights.

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— Medical

Breath test for malaria is in the air

By - April 23, 2015 2 Pictures
At present, diagnosing malaria can be a difficult process involving powerful microscopes and careful scanning of blood samples for tiny parasites in a technique discovered in 1880. But a more accessible method may be in the works. A team of Australian scientists has discovered that certain chemicals are present and can be detected in the breath of sufferers, raising the possibility of a cheap breath test to diagnose the deadly disease. Read More
— Science

Potentially life-saving sensor detects cyanide poisoning in just over a minute

By - March 16, 2015 2 Pictures
As any classic murder mystery or spy thriller will tell you, cyanide is a poison that acts quickly. Once exposed to it, a person can die within 30 minutes. Unfortunately for people who think they might have encountered it, the standard test for determining exposure takes 24 hours. Now, however, a scientist at South Dakota State University has developed a sensor that detects cyanide within a blood sample in just 70 seconds. Read More
— Health and Wellbeing

Researchers develop new paper-based portable lab

By - March 11, 2015 2 Pictures
Point-of-care medical diagnostics technologies offer a fast and cheap way to help patients as they require no experienced personnel or expensive laboratory tests. Several innovations such as a DNA test chip and a biosensor that can detect viruses give us an idea of the possibilities in this field. Now a research team at the University of Rhode Island in the US has developed a paper-based platform that's claimed can perform complex diagnostics. Read More
— Military

BAE Systems develops advanced radar for Eurofighter Typhoon

By - November 25, 2014
BAE Systems is in the process of developing and testing a next-generation radar system for the Eurofighter Typhoon. The Captor E-Scan, fitted in the nose-cone of the fighter, boasts a number of improvements over other Active Electronically Scanned Arrays (AESAs), including a wider field of regard and the provision of advanced electronic warfare protection. Read More
— Science

Carbon nanotubes could find use in improved bomb detection device

By - November 10, 2014 2 Pictures
Along with flame-retardant clothing, flexible supercapitors and a stronger alternative to carbon fiber, carbon nanotubes may soon have yet another application. Led by Prof. Ling Zang, a team of researchers at the University of Utah has integrated the tiny tubes of carbon atoms into a prototype explosives sensor. It can also detect illegal drugs and toxic chemicals such as nerve gas, reportedly doing so better than currently-used technologies. Read More
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