Computational creativity and the future of AI

Detection

Artist's impression of a massive asteroid striking Earth (Image: NASA/Don Davis)

New software based on an algorithm developed in an open competition hosted by NASA improves the detection rate of potentially hazardous near-Earth asteroids. The software comes in the form of a free-to-download application, capable of being run from most laptops or desktops, transforming any amateur astronomer into a seasoned asteroid hunter.  Read More

A swabbed blood sample is inserted in a cartridge, which is in turn placed within the main...

As any classic murder mystery or spy thriller will tell you, cyanide is a poison that acts quickly. Once exposed to it, a person can die within 30 minutes. Unfortunately for people who think they might have encountered it, the standard test for determining exposure takes 24 hours. Now, however, a scientist at South Dakota State University has developed a sensor that detects cyanide within a blood sample in just 70 seconds.  Read More

The paper lab on a strip can carry out complex diagnostics

Point-of-care medical diagnostics technologies offer a fast and cheap way to help patients as they require no experienced personnel or expensive laboratory tests. Several innovations such as a DNA test chip and a biosensor that can detect viruses give us an idea of the possibilities in this field. Now a research team at the University of Rhode Island in the US has developed a paper-based platform that's claimed can perform complex diagnostics.  Read More

Captor E-Scan radar system installed aboard BAE's IPA5 development aircraft (Photo: BAE Sy...

BAE Systems is in the process of developing and testing a next-generation radar system for the Eurofighter Typhoon. The Captor E-Scan, fitted in the nose-cone of the fighter, boasts a number of improvements over other Active Electronically Scanned Arrays (AESAs), including a wider field of regard and the provision of advanced electronic warfare protection.  Read More

Ling Zang with his prototype explosives sensor (Photo: Dan Hixon, University of Utah Colle...

Along with flame-retardant clothing, flexible supercapitors and a stronger alternative to carbon fiber, carbon nanotubes may soon have yet another application. Led by Prof. Ling Zang, a team of researchers at the University of Utah has integrated the tiny tubes of carbon atoms into a prototype explosives sensor. It can also detect illegal drugs and toxic chemicals such as nerve gas, reportedly doing so better than currently-used technologies.  Read More

A dried blood spot analysis that can detect B12 levels has been developed

Vitamin B12 is vital to keep a nervous system healthy. Since it is found mainly in meat and dairy, it is common for people to associate B12 deficiency with vegans, who are aware of this issue (in Germany there's even a B12-enriched toothpaste) and often take measures to supplement. In fact, it is the general population of developing countries who are more likely to lack B12, and it is primarily for them that a team of Canadian researchers has developed a simple, cheap B12 test kit.  Read More

The Jolt Sensor is designed for sports where participants are at the risk of receiving a c...

Heightened awareness of brain injuries and their enduring impacts has seen emphasis grow on immediate concussion testing. Indeed, if some time passes before detection, an additional blow to the already injured brain can have serious consequences. The team behind the Jolt Sensor is looking to make these assessments an instantaneous affair, with a sensor that clips onto an athlete's headwear and vibrates when they receive too heavy a knock.  Read More

Muscle and tendon strains or tears may soon be detectable prior to injury, thanks to new a...

When it comes to muscle, tendon, and bone injuries, early diagnosis can save you from a world of hurt and lengthy rehabilitation. Researchers at Washington University in St Louis have developed algorithms that may one day – after some refinement in imaging techniques – identify tiny strains before they turn into serious injuries.  Read More

The new method will attempt to find traces of a tell-tale radio signal, known as an Io-con...

A new technique pioneered by a team of scientists from the University of Texas, Arlington, may hold the key to detecting moons orbiting distant exoplanets, a feat which is currently beyond the grasp of modern astronomy. Such a technique would afford scientists a greater opportunity of discovering a planetary body capable of sustaining life.  Read More

Dr. Brian Feldman is one of the inventors of the testing system

For people who don't already know, here's the difference between type 1 and type 2 diabetes: the body produces little or no insulin in the case of type 1, and isn't able to utilize the insulin that it does produce in type 2. It's a significant difference, so it's important that patients are diagnosed correctly. Thanks to a new microchip developed by a team at Stanford University led by Dr. Brian Feldman, doing so could soon be quicker, cheaper and easier than ever before.  Read More

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