Advertisement
more top stories »

Data

— Telecommunications

Full-duplex radio integrated circuit could double radio frequency data capacity

By - March 17, 2015 1 Picture
Full-duplex radio communication usually involves transmitters and receivers operating at different frequencies. Simultaneous transmission and reception on the same frequency is the Holy Grail for researchers, but has proved difficult to achieve. Those that have been built have proven complex and bulky, but to be commercially useful in the ever-shrinking world of communications technology, miniaturization is key. To this end, engineers at Columbia University (CU) claim to have created a world-first, full-duplex radio transceiver, all on one miniature integrated circuit. Read More
— Telecommunications

Canary Watch tracks government requests for your information online

By - February 4, 2015 1 Picture
The idea of a warrant canary in information privacy is the story of one clever workaround and one small paradox, a paradox the newly-launched Canary Watch database aims to track. If an ISP or content provider were required by American national security programs to turn over user data, such as Verizon being forced to release ongoing batches of phone call data under the Patriot Act in 2013 (and furthermore being gagged from warning its users) how would anyone know? Read More
— Environment

How big data is helping farmers save millions

By - October 27, 2014 1 Picture
Data scientists studying crop growth and weather patterns in Colombia have advised rice farmers not to plant crops, saving millions of dollars. The International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT) and the Colombian Rice Growers Federation have developed a computer model that can work out what crops work best under specific weather conditions in certain areas. Read More
— Space

LADEE sets data transmission record from lunar orbit

By - October 23, 2013 23 Pictures
NASA’s Lunar Laser Communication Demonstration (LLCD) experiment made history yesterday as it beamed data back to Earth from lunar orbit at previously unheard of speed for a space mission. Operating from the LADEE lunar orbiter, the LLCD used lasers to transmit data to Earth at 622 megabits per second (Mbps) as a demonstration of a technology that NASA hopes will one day not only keep up with the communications demands of future missions, but also greatly enhance their capabilities. Read More
— Mobile Technology

FreedomPop brings free 4G data to iPod touch and iPhone users

By - August 2, 2012 3 Pictures
The iPod touch is more or less an iPhone without the phone functionality. When connected to a Wi-Fi network, it can do most of the same functions as the iPhone. However, Wi-Fi is not available everywhere, and without it, the touch loses some important functionality. FreedomPop is launching an iPod touch case for US$99, that brings free 4G data to touch owners. Read More
— Mobile Technology

Your phone may soon know where you're going before you do

By - July 12, 2012 2 Pictures
Phones obviously already know where we are and where we have been, thanks to GPS and other clever positioning technologies. Now, thanks to an algorithm developed by researchers at the University of Birmingham, your smartphone may soon be able to make accurate educated guesses as to where you’re going to be in 24 hours time. And here’s the dirty trick responsible for the algorithm’s future-telling powers: it spies on your friends and connects the dots where necessary. Read More
— Urban Transport

Transit systems of USA's 25 biggest cities ranked by usefulness

By - April 30, 2012 1 Picture
Walk Score has ranked the 25 largest US cities by the usefulness of their transit systems. New York sits at the top of the list released by the website, which otherwise provides its users with information about the most walkable inner-city neighborhoods. San Francisco came second in the public transit rankings, with Boston, Washington, D.C. and Philadelphia rounding out the top five. Read More
— Good Thinking

Sculptor finds art in economic data

By - April 26, 2012 7 Pictures
With the 3D craze sweeping across everything from movies to printing, it was only a matter of time before data presentation entered the realm of the tangible, too. Sculptor Luke Jerram wanted to better understand the significance of the charts and figures the media bombards us with daily, so he took performance graphs for several years of New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) and Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA) data and rotated them about their X-axis. The resulting sculptures turned out to be both visually compelling and highly unusual. Read More

Subscribe to Gizmag's email newsletter

Advertisement