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CSIRO


— Environment

Handheld device detects and analyzes soil contamination within seconds

By - May 21, 2014 3 Pictures
Contamination of soil from petroleum spills is an ongoing problem that threatens to adversely affect the environment and the health of the people in it, so rapid testing of sites is a pressing issue. However, with laboratory samples and results requiring at least a number of days turn around, particularly in remote locations, rapid analysis is not usually possible. RemScan is a self-contained, hand-held hydrocarbon contamination testing device designed to address this problem. Recently released on the US market, the device is capable of testing many hundred samples a day, providing data on the spot, within seconds, and completely without the need of a laboratory. Read More
— Good Thinking

"We Feel" tool uses Twitter to provide real-time view of world's emotions

By - May 20, 2014 7 Pictures
A new online tool aims to create a real-time emotional map of how people all over the world feel, from analyzing how cheerful or depressed different countries might be, to how budget cuts or other news might hit people emotionally. Called "We Feel," the tool analyzes 32,000 tweets a minute to monitor people's collective mood swings and how their emotions fluctuate over time globally. Read More
— 3D Printing

3D-printed mouthpiece clears the air for sleep apnea sufferers

By - May 8, 2014 3 Pictures
According to the American Sleep Apnea Association, an estimated 22 million Americans suffer from various forms of sleep apnea, a condition where the throat passage is blocked during sleep. Further to an immediate inability to breathe, if left untreated the condition can lead to more serious ailments, such as heart problems, stroke and diabetes. Current solutions can be both costly and uncomfortable, but researchers from Australia's CSIRO have developed a 3D-printed mouthpiece that can be personalized for each patient, potentially adding a more practical alternative to the mix. Read More
— Science

Thousands of Australian bees are getting tagged for research

By - January 15, 2014 2 Pictures
Bees are integral to the pollination of major crops around the world, so the more that we understand how they go about their business, the better we can facilitate the process and thereby boost yields. With this in mind, scientists from Australia's Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) are taking the unprecedented step of equipping up to 5,000 honeybees with RFID (radio frequency identification) tags. Read More
— Science

"Gold leaf" trees discovered in the Australian outback

By - October 23, 2013 3 Pictures
Scientists from Australia's Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation have discovered that eucalyptus trees in the Australian outback are drawing up gold particles from deep underground through their root system and depositing the precious metal in their leaves and branches. Rather than being a new source of "gold leaf," the discovery could provide a cheaper, more environmentally friendly way to uncover valuable gold ore deposits. Read More
— Mobile Technology

Smart Vision lets online shoppers see what they'll look like wearing new specs

By - October 9, 2013 3 Pictures
If you're shopping for clothes online, there are already a number of services you can use to make sure that the garment you're ordering will fit properly. If you're shopping for glasses, however, things get a bit trickier. Additionally, it's important to know whether or not the glasses will look good on you, even if they do fit. That's why Australia's CSIRO (Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation) has developed the Smart Vision system. Read More
— Electronics

Tower of Pisa 3D-scanned in 20 mins with spring-mounted Zebedee

By - September 19, 2013 3 Pictures
Researchers at Australia's national science agency, the CSIRO, have developed Zebedee, a spring-mounted 3D laser scanner and mapper capable of scanning complicated interiors in double-quick time. The researchers were able to scan the "cramped and complex" interior of the Leaning Tower of Pisa which, the CSIRO claims, has not been possible with previous 3D scanning technology. But more significantly, the researchers were able to complete the scan in under 20 minutes. Read More
— Science

Unlocking the sunscreen code of marine life may offer complete UV protection

By - August 14, 2013 6 Pictures
The next generation of powerful sunscreens may have their roots in some unlikely sources – corals from the Great Barrier Reef and bacteria found in the Trondheim Fjord in Norway. When developed, these new sunscreens could offer protection across a wider band of ultraviolet (UV) radiation suspected to cause deadly forms of skin cancer, which current sunscreens don't protect against. The discoveries represent huge breakthroughs, made possible by harnessing the natural sunscreen abilities that these life forms have developed over millions of years to survive the harsh UV radiation in their respective environments. Read More
— Science

Eureka! X-rays detect gold faster and more accurately

By - August 13, 2013 2 Pictures
Every year, Australian mining companies discard hundred of millions of dollars worth of gold. They're not doing it on purpose, it’s just that the standard industry technique of scanning mineral samples isn’t sensitive enough to detect small traces of the precious metal. Australia’s Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) and Canadian company Mevex have tested a new technique using powerful X-rays that can detect these small trace amounts quickly and accurately. Read More
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