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Computer


— Computers

"You lookin' at me?" – Diff Displays system can tell

A team of scientists at the University of St. Andrews, Scotland has developed computer monitors that can detect when a person has stopped looking at them. At first glance, this may sound like some Orwellian micromanger’s dream, but its true purpose is to reduce distraction and increase productivity while taking the pressure off people whose jobs require staring at multiple displays for long periods. Read More
— Games

Stinky Footboard lets gamers put their foot down – and up, and left, and right

Games have come a long way since the days of Pong and its knob controller. These days, some computer users aren't content even with a 101 key keyboard and mouse combo. This has led to input devices that attempt to bring feet into the mix, such as the SoftStep KeyWorx and Thanko USB Foot Switch. The latest foot-centric input device to catch our eye comes from Canada-based Stelulu Technology, whose Stinky Footboard is aimed at gamers for whom two hands just aren't enough. Read More
— Science

IBM's Watson supercomputer goes to university

IBM has announced that it will provide a Watson supercomputer system to Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) for a three year period, the first time that a complete Watson system has been provided to a university. Faculty, graduate students, and undergraduates will have opportunities to work directly with the Watson system. Not only will Watson be the object of Artificial Intelligence (AI) research, but it will also (virtually) attend courses in English and math to hone its analytic skills. Read More
— Science

World's oldest digital computer restored to life at age 60

The Harwell Dekatron computer is a 1950s computer having roughly the weight and size of a Hummer H3 and the computing power of a four-function pocket calculator. Having been restored to its original operating condition using 95 percent original parts, it is now the oldest functioning programmable digital computer in the world. Guinness might have been onto something, when, in 1973, they named the Dekatron the Most Durable Computer in the World. Read More
— Computers

LG announces 21:9 UltraWide Monitor with four-screen split feature

Since unveiling the very first cinema-proportioned HD TV back in 2009, Philips has been leading the charge to get the distinctly oblong screens into our living rooms. Yet despite the powerful draw of immersive movie-theater-like viewing goodness, the buying public's cash (for the most part) continues to be thrown at 16:9 aspect screens. LG is trying another approach to kick start the ultra-widescreen invasion, by launching the world's first 21:9 aspect computer monitor. In addition to its obvious appeal to digital film buffs, the 29-inch EA93 is also being pitched at power users who currently multi-task across multiple displays (in my case a hotchpotch setup of 4:3 and 16:9 mixed displays). Read More
— Games

Real-life linking book from Myst for sale at $15k

In Myst, the successful graphic adventure video game released by Cyan back in 1993, linking books are written by the D'Ni people using a process known simply as "the Art." The purpose of these linking books is to transport people to other worlds known to the D'Ni as Ages. Linking books play an integral part in Myst and its sequels, and now a working replica of one has been created. Not "working" in the sense that it can transport the reader to other ages, but working in the sense that the Cyan games can be played using this real-life version of the linking book. Read More
— Computers

Extremely rare fully-operational Apple I computer up for auction

On April 1, 1976, a new company was established to sell a ready-made personal computer designed and built by Steve Wozniak. The first Apple computers were assembled in the family garage of business partner and friend Steve Jobs and sold to the Byte Shop for US$500 each, subsequently retailing for $666.66. The rest, as they say, is history. Apple has since become a colossal consumer electronics concern, and of the 200 or so Apple I computers ever produced, only 43 have survived. Of those, just six are still in working order and one of those is scheduled to hit the auction block in Germany next month. Read More
— Wearable Electronics

Motorola HC1 Headset Computer with voice recognition and gesture control

Motorola Solutions has released its own head-mounted wearable computer based on Kopin Corporation’s Golden-i headset. Aimed at industrial and military users who need to keep their hands free on the job while viewing documents and schematics or getting help from far afield specialists, the Motorola HC1 Headset Computer places an 800 x 600 (SVGA) full color TFT micro-display at a viewing distance that provides a virtual image size of 15 inches. In keeping with the hands-free theme, the headset can be controlled via voice recognition and gesture controls. Read More
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