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Cocoa flavanols, naturally occurring compounds in cocoa, can reverse age-related memory de...

Do you forget where you left your keys or parked the car, or have difficulty remembering the names of people you’ve just met? The good news is that chocolate – or more specifically, naturally occurring compounds in cocoa called flavanols – can reverse age-related memory decline in healthy older adults, according to a Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) study.  Read More

A sample of the MoS2 material that could be the basis for piezoelectric devices that are o...

Researchers from Columbia University and the Georgia Institute of Technology are laying claim to having observed piezoelectricity in an atomically thin material for the first time. The effect was demonstrated in the world's thinnest electric generator made from a two-dimensional molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) material, which had previously been predicted to exhibit such properties.  Read More

The direction of magnetic north suddenly reversed about 786,000 years ago, with new resear...

A new study by a team of scientists from Italy, France, Columbia University and the University of California, Berkeley, demonstrates that the Earth's magnetic field could change polarity in less than 100 years. The last magnetic reversal occurred some 786,000 years ago and was previously thought to have taken several thousand years but, if the researchers are right, the real time it may take for the flip to occur could actually be closer to the span of a human life.  Read More

 XRay helps users see how popular online services track their personal information  (Image...

A new software tool developed at Columbia University is providing valuable insights into how some very popular websites make use of the sensitive data they collect from their users. The software could help sniff out potential abuses from advertisers and contribute in making the usage of sensitive data a lot more transparent to the end user.  Read More

Researchers used 'Playdrone' to reveal crucial security flaws in Google Play apps, includi...

Researchers at Columbia University School of Engineering performing a large-scale measurement study on the Google Play marketplace have revealed crucial security problems, including secret key data stored by developers in their apps that, if stolen, could be exploited to steal user data from the likes of Amazon and Facebook.  Read More

The humidity-driven flexing of a spore-covered piece of latex rubber (right) drives the mo...

Ozgur Sahin believes that water evaporation is the largest power source in nature. In an effort to demonstrate the potential of this untapped resource, Sahin and his fellow researchers have created prototype electrical generators with rubber sheets that move in response to changes in humidity thanks to a coating of bacterial spores.  Read More

Scientists convert human embryonic stem cells into functional lung epithelial cells (green...

Researchers at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) have transformed human stem cells into functional lung cells, paving the way for ultimately creating bioengineered lungs using the patient's own cells. Besides being able to generate lung tissue for transplants, these cells could also be used to study lung development and potentially find more advanced treatments for lung diseases.  Read More

The development of graphene based nanoelectromechanical systems could lead to even slimmer...

A team of engineers from Columbia University has created a nano-mechanical system with the ability to create FM radio signals. In other words, they've built what is effectively the world’s smallest FM radio transmitter.  Read More

Researchers have created new human hairs using dermal papilla cells found inside the base ...

Current hair transplantation techniques essentially rob Peter to pay Paul, redistributing hair, usually from the back of the head, to the balding area. However, according to Angela M. Christiano from Columbia University Medical Center, about 90 percent of women with hair loss are not strong candidates for hair transplantation surgery because of insufficient donor hair. A new technique developed by Dr Christiano and colleagues that generates new human hair growth from a patient's own cells could make transplantation feasible for such women, as well as men in the early stages of baldness.  Read More

Columbia University researchers have come up with a way to produce large joined sheets of ...

A study conducted at Columbia University has revealed that even when stitched together from much smaller fragments, large sheets of graphene still retain much of their mechanical properties. The discovery may be a crucial step forward in the mass-production of carbon nanotubes that could be used to manufacture flexible electronics, ultra-light and strong materials, and perhaps even the first space elevator.  Read More

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