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Clock


— Environment

Atomic clocks could be used to monitor volcanoes and predict eruptions

If you've ever been to Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming, you may have been aware of two things; its magnificent grandeur, and the fact that it's an active supervolcano that, if it ever erupted again, would be worst event to hit the Earth since the dinosaur-killing asteroid. To help keep an eye out for this and similar events, a team at the University of Zurich have developed a means of monitoring volcanic events using atomic clocks.

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— Around The Home

SensorWake alarm clock wakes you up with your favorite aromas

Let's be honest, there isn't really an easy way to get up in the morning. Your warm, toasty bed will always be warm and toasty, and outside of it will always present a cold and unfathomable start to the day. Still, that hasn't stopped a long line of takes on the classic alarm clock designed to make mornings that little bit easier. The latest to clock on in this ongoing struggle is French startup by SensorWake, whose tabletop timepiece sees your favorite scents waft through your nostrils just as you're due to wake.

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— Space

NASA to test atomic clock to keep space missions on time

If you thought the Apple watch was something to write home about, take a look at NASA's Deep Space Atomic Clock (DSAC). This miniaturized, ultra-precise mercury-ion atomic clock is described by the space agency as "orders of magnitude more stable than today's best navigational clocks," and is smaller and more accurate than any that's been previously sent into space. In 2016, it will fly on a test mission to demonstrate a technology that NASA sees as key to a number of high-priority Earth-orbit and deep space missions. Read More
— Space

NASA unveils countdown clock for the 21st century

It's one of the most famous timepieces in history that's been seen by billions of people all over the world, yet, though it's big, its name isn't Ben. It's the countdown clock at Cape Canaveral, Florida, which has sat in the foreground of historic space mission launches since it was installed in 1969 during the heyday of the Apollo program. But after almost half a century of service, NASA is replacing it with a high-tech LED version that makes its public debut on Thursday during the launch of the Orion EFT-1 mission. Read More
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