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Breathalyzers

Automotive

New tools in the fight against drunk driving revealed

America's National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has shown members of Congress the latest advances it has made in the quest for anti drunk-driving technology in the car. Working in partnership with an industry consortium, the NHTSA unveiled a test-car designed to help it fine-tune driver interactions with potentially life-saving anti drunk-driving innovations.Read More

Health & Wellbeing

Portable fat breathalyzer indicates if you’re burning fat

While there's no shortage of breathalyzers capable of detecting if you’ve had one too many drinks, a prototype device developed by researchers at NTT DOCOMO Research Laboratories analyzes your breath to detect if your body is burning fat. Besides letting users know if that exercise regime is actually shedding some pounds, its creators say the portable sensor could be helpful for diabetics and those trying to lose weight manage their daily diet.Read More

Wearables

Tokyoflash's new watch tells the time and your blood alcohol level

There are plenty of pocket-sized breathalyzers on the market, but those can be awkward to keep on you at all times. If you want a gadget with some style that can also tell how blotto you are while out on the town, Tokyoflash has you covered. The Japanese watch-maker's new Kisai Intoxicated wristwatch has a built-in breathalyzer so you can always check if your blood alcohol content (BAC) is low enough to legally drive.Read More

Health & Wellbeing

BreathalEyes app tells you if you're too drunk to drive

Common sense should be enough to tell us that getting behind the wheel of a car after consuming alcohol is not a particularly good idea, but still there are those who stupidly risk life and liberty by driving home after the party. When trying to convince such people to call a taxi, friends are often faced with a call for proof that the would-be driver is unfit to drive. Instead of analyzing a user's breath to determine alcohol content, the BreathalEyes app for iPhone detects involuntary eye movement in a similar way to field sobriety tests undertaken by police patrols.Read More

Science

Gel sensors to detect bomb chemicals and illegal drugs in seconds

Sensors that quickly detect chemicals used to make bombs are being developed by scientists at Queen’s University, Belfast. The devices will use special gel pads to "swipe" a person or crime scene to gather a sample which is then analyzed by a scanning instrument that can detect the presence of chemicals within seconds, much quicker than current analysis methods. This will allow better, faster decisions to be made in response to terrorist threats. The team is also working on devices that detect illegal drugs and will hopefully be deployed by police as roadside drug "breathalyzers".Read More

Health & Wellbeing

HawkEye drug-recognition tool aids law enforcement

January 5, 2008 The AcuNetx HawkEye law enforcement system, which magnifies and records tell-tale signs of drug intoxication in a suspect’s pupils, has been awarded two separate patents by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. The tool is now being used by highway patrol officers and at sobriety checkpoints across the U.S.A.Read More

Automotive

Volvo introduces voluntary Alcolocks from 2008

September 5, 2007 One in three traffic fatalities in Europe is alcohol related and around 3,000 people in the UK are killed or seriously injured each year in drink drive collisions. In an effort to help drivers make responsible choices, Volvo is the first manufacturer to launch a fully integrated, voluntary in-car breathalyzer/alcolock system called Alcoguard as an option to its 2008 range, which prevents the car from starting if the driver is over the blood alcohol limit.Read More

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