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Brain Machine Interface


— Science

Connected brains share control of virtual limbs and predict the weather

By - July 13, 2015 1 Picture

If the thought of using a person's brainwaves to control a machine isn't quite enough to make the mind boggle, then mixing signals from multiple brains for the same purpose might just do the job. This far-fetched field of neuroscience is edging ever closer to real-world technology, with a number of recent research efforts achieving significant advances, with mind-controlled drone flight just one example. The latest step forward in this area sees the brains of separate animals hooked up and their combined motor and sensory information used for things like controlling a virtual arm, pattern recognition and even predicting the weather.

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— Robotics

Mind-controlled telepresence robot to get paralyzed people out and about

By - June 30, 2015 2 Pictures

A telepresence robot developed at the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) that can be controlled by thought may give people with severe motor disabilities a greater level of independence. Successfully put through its paces by 19 people scattered around Central Europe – nine of whom are quadriplegic and all of whom were hooked up to a brain-machine interface – the robot handled obstacle detection and avoidance on its own while the person controlling it gave general navigation instructions.

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— Good Thinking

Brain-controlled exoskeleton to help kick off FIFA 2014 World Cup

By - June 11, 2014 6 Pictures
On June 12th, the FIFA 2014 World Cup in Brazil will be kicked off by a paralyzed person using a highly innovative brain-controlled robotic exoskeleton. This feat is being carried out as a demonstration of the current state-of-the art in assisted mobility technology, as the researchers involved – part of the "Walk Again Project" – work toward refining their invention. Read More
— Electronics

OpenBCI Kickstarts an open-source platform for mind-machine melding

By - January 4, 2014 5 Pictures
Last year saw a rise in brain-controlled interfaces allowing users to control devices with their thoughts (read more about it in our overview of 2013’s scientific innovations). But unless you have access to a research lab, you may be forced to rely on EEG monitoring devices that close off access to data, or restrict how you can use sensors. The OpenBCI project on Kickstarter aims to address these problems with an EEG platform that simplifies viewing and utilizing brainwaves, for researchers and hobbyists alike. Read More
— Health and Wellbeing

Scientists treat disabled rats by "bridging the gap" in their brains

By - December 10, 2013 2 Pictures
Victims of traumatic brain injuries often lose the ability to perform certain actions, due to the fact that two or more regions of their brain are no longer able to communicate with one another. However, in the same way that a spliced-in wire can circumvent a broken electrical connection, scientists have recently demonstrated that an electronic brain-machine-brain interface can restore lost abilities to brain-damaged rats. The research could lead to the development of prosthetic devices for treatment of injured humans. Read More
— Science

Monkeys control arms of avatar using their mind

By - November 7, 2013 1 Picture
Recently there's been increasing hope for people who have lost the use of their arms, as various research institutes have started developing prosthetic arms that can be controlled by thought alone. So far, all of the systems have just allowed users to control a single arm – for many of the tasks that we perform on a daily basis, that's simply not enough. Now, however, scientists at North Carolina's Duke University have succeeded in getting two rhesus monkeys to control both arms of animated digital avatars, using nothing but their mind. Read More
— Robotics

Mind-controlled robot avatars inch towards reality

By - November 13, 2012 5 Pictures
Researchers at the CNRS-AIST Joint Robotics Laboratory (a collaboration between France's Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique and Japan's National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology) are developing software that allows a person to drive a robot with their thoughts. The technology could one day give a paralyzed patient greater autonomy through a robotic agent or avatar. Read More
— Science

Neurological discovery could lead to machines that speak for the speechless

By - August 22, 2012 1 Picture
Recently, scientists unlocked the code used by neurons in the retina for sending visual data to the brain. This allowed them to create a device that restored almost-normal vision to blind mice. Now, another group of scientists has announced that they have determined the brain’s code for pronouncing vowels, and they believe that their discovery could lead to machines that speak for people who are physically unable to do so. Read More
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