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Blood Pressure

Health & Wellbeing

New blood pressure tech says ciao to arm cuffs

Generally, if a doctor wants to know a patient's blood pressure, they have to place a cuff around the person's arm and inflate it. Not only can this be uncomfortable for the patient, but it also only indicates what their blood pressure is at the time that the test is performed. That's why scientists at Australia's Monash University are developing an alternative – a cuffless blood pressure estimation system that is worn for hours at a time, wirelessly transmitting real-time readings.Read More

Health & Wellbeing Review

Review: Does the Mocaheart have its finger on the pulse of heart health?

Heart disease and high blood pressure are the world's leading killers and one way to combat them is to track key health indicators, such as blood pressure and heart rate. The problem is that even with the introduction of digital technology, it's often difficult for people to regularly take readings and interpret the results. One alternative to traditional sphygmometers and stethoscopes is Mocacare's Mocaheart cardiovascular health monitor, which we put through its paces.Read More

Medical

New combination of drugs slows heart decline in muscular dystrophy patients

Signs of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) can start to appear in boys as young as six, leading to deterioration of the heart muscles and ultimately death. Pharmaceuticals aimed at controlling high blood pressure have been used to treat the one in 3,500 young males suffering from the condition, but a new study suggests that a novel combination of these drugs could slow the decline in heart function earlier on, and in promising new ways. Read More

Health & Wellbeing

Darma smart cushion monitors posture through your butt

We have seen posture trackers that attach to our backs and waists, but if we were to look to any part of our body to keep tabs on our sitting habits, it would be our backsides that know best, right? The team behind Darma is banking on our buttocks painting a clearer picture, developing a smart cushion that monitors how we sit to provide feedback on posture, stress levels, heart rate and respiration. Read More

Health & Wellbeing

Electronic cuff in neck could keep blood pressure in check

High blood pressure can be a very serious condition, and is usually controlled via medication along with lifestyle changes. For approximately 35 percent of patients, however, that medication doesn't work in the long run. That's why a team of researchers from Germany's University of Freiburg are developing an implantable electronic cuff, that may one day control peoples' blood pressure via electrical pulses within the neck. Read More

Health & Wellbeing

Qardio unveils portable, wireless cardiovascular monitoring devices

Thanks to the miniaturization of electronics and wireless technology, detailed cardiovascular monitoring no longer requires a visit to the doctor's clinic or a hospital. A new wave of cardiovascular monitoring devices can be carried or worn by patients as they go about their daily routine, with the collected data able to be transmitted wirelessly to healthcare professionals and family members. Healthcare company Qardio has unveiled two such devices that allow patients suffering, or at risk of developing cardiovascular conditions, to better monitor their health.Read More

Health & Wellbeing

Piezo-resistive fibers enable "blood pressure watch" with continuous monitoring

Blood pressure is one of the main vital signs, measuring the pressure of the blood upon the walls of blood vessels as it is pumped around the body by the heart. High blood pressure, or hypertension, places increased stress on the heart and can be an indicator of other potentially fatal health problems, such as stroke, heart attack, and heart failure. Most people will have had their blood pressure tested using a sphygmomanometer on a visit to the doctor, but a new wristband device is set to provide a more convenient and continuous way to keep a watch for signs of trouble.Read More

Medical

Spray-on skin speeds healing of venous leg ulcers

According the UK’s National Health Service, one person in 50 over the age of 80 will develop venous leg ulcers. The ulcers occur when high blood pressure in the veins of the legs causes damage to the adjacent skin, ultimately resulting in the breakdown of that tissue. While the ulcers can be quite resistant to treatment, a team of scientists is now reporting success in using a sort of “spray-on skin” to heal them.Read More

Medical

Research suggests "broken heart syndrome" protects heart from adrenaline overload

If you haven't heard about takotsubo cardiomyopathy, also known as "broken heart syndrome," you may be surprised to find that one to two percent of people who are initially suspected of having a heart attack are finally discovered to have this increasingly recognized syndrome. New research suggests the condition that temporarily causes heart failure in people who experience severe stress might actually protect the heart from very high levels of adrenaline.Read More

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