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Biosensors

Medical

Sensor detects signs of cancer, Alzheimer's, and Parkinson's

Cancer and neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's are all able to be better treated if detected early. Unfortunately, this is not always the case as symptoms may not appear until these diseases are well established. To help counteract this problem, scientists at the National Nanotechnology Laboratory (LNNano) in Brazil have created a biosensor capable of rapidly detecting molecules specifically linked to various cancers and neurological diseases.Read More

Medical

New low-cost Zika test looks good on paper

Researchers have developed a low-cost, paper-based method of detecting viruses like Zika and Ebola in a biological sample, and which can even identify a specific strain. The team believes the test can be used in the field to quickly and easily detect the presence of a virus, and be used to help slow the spread of future outbreaks.Read More

Medical

Silk-based functional inks put biosensor data on your fingertips

Although we've seen "bio-inks" that allow sensors to be drawn directly on a person's skin and other surfaces to gauge things like glucose levels, functional inks such as this are usually heat-sensitive, meaning they aren't suitable for use in inkjet printers. Researchers at Tufts University have now developed silk-based inks containing bacteria-sensing agents that can withstand the rigors of inkjet printing, opening the door much wider for printing biomolecules.Read More

Science

Toxin-detection system inspired by turkeys

Turkeys may not be everyone's idea of beautiful birds, but they certainly have colorful skin on their heads. What's more, that skin changes color with the animal's mood. Scientists at the University of California, Berkeley, have now copied the process by which those color changes occur, and used it to create a biosensor that could be used to detect airborne toxins. Read More

Environment

PLEASED project working on "plant-borgs" to act as environmental biosensors

Many claim that talking to plants helps them grow faster. But what if the plants could talk back? That’s what the EU-funded PLants Employed As SEnsing Devices (PLEASED) project is hoping to achieve by creating plant cyborgs, or "plant-borgs." While this technology won't allow green thumbs to carry on a conversation with their plants, it will provide feedback on their environment by enabling the plants to act as biosensors.Read More

Science

iPhone biosensor does the work of a $50,000 lab-based machine

We already know that smartphones can perform many of the same features as more expensive computers, cameras and other devices. Now, a portable iPhone cradle made up of about US$200 worth of electronics is claimed to be as accurate of a biosensor as a $50,000 spectrophotometer that remains stuck in a lab. Read More

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