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Biofeedback

Designer Sam Matson has created a headset that increases the difficulty of a game the more...

Seattle-based visual designer Sam Matson has created a headset aimed at helping gamers learn to control "gamer rage." The Immersion headset monitors the user's heart rate and increases the difficulty of a game, the less calm they become.  Read More

Nevermind detects the player's fear levels making the game harder as their fear rises and ...

While traditional horror video games seek to provide an exciting thrill, Nevermind is a biofeedback-enhanced horror game that has greater ambitions. It requires you to manage your anxiety in alarming scenarios – the more stressed you feel, the harder the game becomes. The aim, says Erin Reynolds, its creator, is for players to learn how to not let their fears get the best of them in nerve-wracking situations and hopefully carry over their gameplay-acquired skills into the real world.  Read More

The AMES device, which has just received FDA approval

Last week, the US Food and Drug Administration granted clearance to a new device that could be of considerable aid to stroke victims or people with partial spinal cord injuries. Created by Dr. Paul Cordo of the Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU) in collaboration with OHSU spinoff company AMES, the "AMES device" reportedly helps the brain get paralyzed muscles moving again.  Read More

An experimental new video game is designed to help children with anger problems to control...

Often, when people talk about children and the psychological effects of playing video games, it’s nothing good – there are certainly plenty of individuals who maintain that if a child spends too much time blowing away virtual enemies, they will become more aggressive, antisocial people in the real world. A new game developed at Boston Children's Hospital, however, is intended to do just the opposite. It helps children with anger problems to control their temper, so they’ll get along better with other people.  Read More

RESPeRATE is a device that is designed to lower blood pressure by getting its users to bre...

People suffering from hypertension (also known as high blood pressure) are typically advised to switch to a healthier diet, get more exercise and lose weight, plus they are often put on a combination of several medications. As of today, UK residents are now also able to get a prescription for what is definitely a different type of treatment – a system known as RESPeRATE. It monitors the patient’s breathing and uses sound to guide them into taking longer, slower breaths, thus relaxing their bodies. According to its makers, multiple clinical trials have shown that it causes significant, lasting reductions in blood pressure.  Read More

Clothing incorporating Wearable Absence technology

You’ve had a hard day at the office, your spouse is currently over 2,000 miles away and now your boss says he wants you to work late. It’s all you can do to contain your anger until you get into the bathroom, whereupon you let loose with a string of red-faced, high-cardio profanity. At that point, your spouse talks to you via your shirt. “Take it easy, it’s all right,” they coo from your collar, as they play your favorite song, and photos of them scroll across your chest. Hey, it could happen. No, really, it could happen, thanks to the Wearable Absence project. Researchers involved in the program are working on developing intelligent textiles, that comfort the wearer by evoking memories of absent loved ones.  Read More

HeartMath's emWave Personal Stress Reliever

Here at Gizmag we try to keep our stress levels down, but sometimes a stiff drink and a quick match at Guitar Hero doesn't quite cut it, so we naturally fell in love with HeartMath's emWave Personal Stress Reliever. The emWave PSR is a handheld device that monitors your heart rate and provides feedback that allows you to train yourself to maintain a regular heart rate and breathing rhythm - resulting in reduced stress. We originally covered the emWave PSR when it was first released in 2006 - but at CES 2009, Gizmag's Kate Seamer got a chance to try it out and have a chat with Catherine Calarco from HeartMath.  Read More

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