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bike lights


— Bicycles Review

Review: Blaze bike light uses a laser to keep cyclists safer

According to a study conducted by the UK's Transport Research Laboratory, 79 percent of bicycle-vs-car accidents occurred when drivers maneuvered into the path of cyclists travelling at speed. In order to help lower that number, University of Brighton product design student Emily Brooke created the Blaze Laserlight as a final-year project. The bicycle headlight is designed to let motorists know that a bike is approaching, by laser-projecting an image of a bicycle onto the road approximately six meters (20 ft) in front of the rider. Four years and one successful Kickstarter campaign later, the Laserlight is now available to buyers in North America. We recently had a chance to try it out for ourselves.

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— Bicycles Review

Review: Magnic Light iC combines best features of battery and dynamo bike lights

When it comes to power for bike lights, there are two main options: batteries that have to be charged/replaced, and dynamos. The latter either push against the side of the tire, have to be pre-built into one of the hubs, or require magnets to be mounted on the wheel – in all cases, dynamos also create a slight braking effect when in use. German inventor Dirk Strothmann's Magnic Light iC, however, lets the wheel spin freely and doesn't require the installation of anything other than the compact light itself. Is it too good to be true? We tried out the latest version, in order to find out.

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— Bicycles

See.Sense Icon bike lights know what's going on, and communicate with your phone

It was just a couple of years ago that we first heard about See.Sense bike lights. Using integrated sensors, they can determine when the rider is doing things such as going through a road junction, navigating a roundabout, or moving through lanes of traffic – they can also tell when the sun is going down, or when vehicle headlights are approaching. In all cases, the lights respond by shining brighter and blinking faster. Now, their inventors have added even more functions by creating a connected version of the lights, known as See.Sense Icon.

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— Bicycles Review

Review: WingLights bike turn indicators have a certain magnetism

As any dedicated bicycle commuter will tell you, it’s important to let motorists know when and in which direction you’re turning. At night, however, drivers might not always see your hand signals. Using illuminated gloves is one solution, but British startup Cycl is now offering another: LED turn indicators that attach magnetically to the ends of your handlebars. They’re called WingLights, and we recently had the chance to try them out for ourselves.

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— Bicycles Review

Review: Light & Motion Urban Trail 850 FC bike light is compact but packs a wallop

Thanks to continuing advances in LED and lithium battery technology, it's now not uncommon to see mountain bike headlights putting out 3,000 lumens or more. Most of these high-intensity lights incorporate two or three bulbs, however, requiring a separate battery pack to power them. With this in mind, we were intrigued when we heard that Light & Motion had declared its self-contained new Urban 850 Trail FC to be "the most powerful single-LED bike light that exists." We gave it a try and liked what it has to offer ... even if its claim may be a little hard to substantiate.

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