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Baby

— Around The Home

Dormi turns Android devices into baby monitors

By - February 18, 2014 2 Pictures
Baby monitors are one of the multitude of things that parents have to remember to pack when going away for a weekend, or that they don't have to hand when visits with friends last longer than expected. A new app solves this problem, for families with two or more Android devices. Dormi replaces the need for a dedicated baby monitor by turning one device into a transmitter that captures audio, and relays it to one or more other receiver devices. Read More
— Children

Edison-powered Mimo Baby Monitor ushers in the Internet of Things

By - January 11, 2014 6 Pictures
The Mimo Baby Monitor puts anxious parents at ease by providing them with a constant stream of data about their little sweetheart. The sensors embedded in an infant bodysuite, called the Kimono, monitor the baby’s respiration. The data is passed on to a small turtle-shaped gizmo, nested in the Kimono, which in turn measures skin temperature, body position and the activity pattern. All this information is then relayed via low-power bluetooth to a Wi-Fi enabled docking station so that parents can access all the details via their smartphones. Read More
— Robotics

"Robobaby" gives teens an idea of what parenting is really like

By - November 8, 2013 3 Pictures
There's a popular educational exercise in which teens are required to take care of a bag of flour for several days, as if it's a baby. The idea is that by having to lug that bag around with them everywhere they go, while keeping it from getting damaged, the kids will realize how much responsibility is involved in raising an infant. As any parent will tell you, however, there's a lot more to baby-raising than just safely lugging them around. That's why products like Realityworks' RealCare Baby were created. Read More
— Health and Wellbeing

Owlet smart sock keeps tabs on your baby's vital signs

By - September 11, 2013 6 Pictures
Can a sock reassure you of a baby's well-being? Perhaps it can, if it's the Owlet. Created by Owlet baby care, this sensor-lined sock monitors a baby's vital signs through its foot, and transmits the data to a smartphone app or internet-based device via Bluetooth. Parents can check on a baby's skin temperature, heart rate, blood oxygen levels and sleep quality at a glance, and even be alerted to the baby rolling over. As a monitoring tool rather than a medical or diagnostic device, the smart sock aims to help parents be more aware of potential health-related danger signs so that they can take preemptive action. Read More
— Children

Skoda makes the baby stroller more manly

By - July 26, 2013 4 Pictures
Correct or not, some men have the impression that transporting the baby is the woman's domain. Equipment designed for baby transportation is by extension "women's gear." One European automaker decided to flip this perception on its head by creating an uprated stroller specifically for men. Now there's no excuse for a father not to take the baby for a walk. Read More
— Health and Wellbeing

Smart Diapers test chidren's urine to monitor their health over time

By - July 16, 2013 4 Pictures
Diapers usually rank very low on the list of items in need of a high-tech upgrade, despite products like the TweetPee recently hitting the market. But unlike a Twitter-enabled diaper, which provides information that anyone with a nose could figure out on their own, a new diaper from Pixie Scientific could actually warn parents of health issues before they become serious. The Smart Diaper uses several reactive agents and an app to monitor irregularities in an infant's urine over time and alerts parents if they need to visit a doctor. Read More
— Health and Wellbeing

Scientists developing a baby cry analyzer

By - July 12, 2013 1 Picture
Although Homer Simpson’s brother’s Baby Translator may still only be a whimsical concept, Rhode Island scientists have developed something that could prove to be even more valuable. Researchers at Brown University teamed up with faculty at Women & Infants Hospital, to create a computer tool that may find use detecting neurological or developmental problems in infants, by analyzing their cries. Read More
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