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Artificial Intelligence


— Computers

"Social AI" lets Mario and Luigi learn how to save the princess on their own

Old-school gamers will fondly remember the effort it took them to master a new Super Mario level, but thanks to a new development in artificial intelligence the pixelated Italian plumber and his friends are now teaming up to do the job themselves. Researchers from the University of Tübingen in Germany have developed an algorithm that allows videogame characters to learn from each other in human-like ways through observation and imitation, letting agents collaborate to reach a common goal. Future applications could include intelligent social support systems and swarms of modular robots that learn to perform complex actions on little human instruction.

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— Computers

New algorithm helps machines learn as quickly as humans

An artificial intelligence breakthrough from the universities of New York, Toronto and MIT is showcasing the impressive ability of artificial intelligence to learn visual concepts in a single shot and manipulate them in human-like ways. The advance could lead to smarter phones, much-improved speech recognition, and computers that better understand the world around them.

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— Wearable Electronics

Gabriel computer system offers a guiding voice to users

If you ever wished you had an angel at your shoulder to give tips on how to carry out a difficult job, a digital version may not be that far off. A team of scientists at Carnegie Mellon University are working on a wearable cognitive assistance computer system named after the angel Gabriel that observes what a person is doing, provides prompts to help in completing tasks in real time, and avoids being a pest when not needed.

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— Computers

IBM's Watson gets chatty to act as a sounding board

While researchers around the world are making gradual gains in the monumental task of developing artificial intelligences that can creatively solve problems or produce art, IBM's Watson supercomputer has now learned how to help people get more creative. Six student teams at Georgia Tech trained Watson to chat with them about the many systems from nature that we could mimic in solving big problems such as long-term space travel and more efficient desalination processes.

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— Drones

NVIDIA's credit card-sized machine learning module ups to IQ of prototype drone

Silicon Valley-based commercial drone company Kespry has demonstrated a prototype drone that utilizes an NVIDIA artificial intelligence technology to recognize objects and learn about its environment. The prototype, which is based on the Kesprey Drone System already being sold to the materials, mining, and construction industries, uses the NVIDIA Jetson TX1 module, which ups the device's intelligence by giving it the ability to run complex algorithms.

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— Good Thinking

Fujitsu begins field trials of AI app to alleviate congestion following major events

We’ve all been there. The time comes to leave the big game, Black Friday shopping, or some other event that draws a crowd, and everyone is left shuffling their feet due to the inevitable congestion. Fujitsu wants to change that and has begun field trials on a smartphone app that gives incentives to those who would wait it out. Using an artificial intelligence-enhanced system it calls Human-Centric Zinrai, the app aims to find the best candidates for staying behind and the incentive most likely to entice them to do so.

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— Medical

Machine learning algorithms could predict breast cancer treatment responses

Different patients with the same type of cancer can have different responses to the same medication, which leaves doctors in a tough spot: how do they know which treatment will have the best response? If they get it right, their patient may enter remission; but if they're wrong the patient's health will deteriorate. Now researchers at Western University might have the answer. They developed machine learning algorithms – a branch of artificial intelligence – that crunch genetic data to determine the most likely treatment response and allow more personalized treatment regimens.

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— Children Review

Review: Smartphone-controlled racing with Robotic Enhanced Vehicles

Remote controlled cars make for some great small-scale demolition derbies, but unless there's a second person to play with, the game gets dull real fast. At this year's London Toy Fair, WowWee unveiled its Robotic Enhanced Vehicles (REV), robotic race cars that allow players to battle against one another or against an AI opponent. We recently charged up a pair, launched the control app, and let the mayhem begin.

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