Shopping? Check out our latest product comparisons

Antibiotic

Fusing 3D-printed beads with antibacterial or chemotherapeutic compounds provides the pote...

A great strength of 3D-printing in the field of medicine is the ability to provide low-cost, personalized implants molded to a patient's anatomy. Researchers from Louisiana Tech University have now taken the technology one step further, loading these custom implants with cancer-fighting and antiobiotic compounds as a means of better targeted drug delivery.  Read More

A new antibacterial gel has been shown to penetrate and kill off certain kinds of superbug...

Drug-resistant bacteria, or so-called superbugs, pose a very real threat to public health. The over prescription and consumption of antibiotics has contributed to a resilient new breed of germs that could see minor infections once again evolve into life-threatening conditions. The latest development in the fight against this threat comes from scientists at Queens University in Belfast, who have produced an antibacterial gel capable of breaking through a protective casing and killing off certain types of drug-resistant bacteria.  Read More

Penguin measures antibiotic residue in food

We've already heard about a biosensor developed in Brazil for detecting pesticide content in food. Now at CE Week, a Seoul-based company called BioSensor Laboratories has presented Penguin, a home-use sensor that detects the presence of antibiotics in animal products.  Read More

Researchers have discovered a way to lower the defenses of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, ...

The discovery of antibiotics is one of the most important breakthroughs of the 20th century. But their effectiveness and low cost has led to their overuse, resulting in the worrying rise of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, or so-called superbugs. Researchers at the University of East Anglia (UAE) in England have now uncovered an Achille's heel in the bacterial cell defenses that could mean that bacteria wouldn't develop drug-resistance in the first place.  Read More

A new approach targets bad bacterai, such as Salmonella (pictured), while leaving good bac...

The increasing prevalence of bacteria resistant to antibiotic drugs is largely blamed on the over prescription and use of such drugs in humans and animals, leading to the evolution of so-called "superbugs." A new antibiotic "smart bomb" that can target specific strains of bacteria could provide the next-generation antibiotic drugs needed to stave off the threat of antibiotic-resistant bacteria.  Read More

Only a few bacteria are left over, after the hydrogel was used to destroy a solid bacteria...

Whether it’s in hospitals, restaurant kitchens or our homes, harmful bacteria such as E.coli are a constant concern. Making matters worse is the fact that such bacteria are increasingly developing a resistance to antibiotics. This has led to a number of research projects, which have utilized things such as blue light, cold plasma and ozone to kill germs. One of the latest non-antibiotic bacteria-slayers is a hydrogel developed by IBM Research and the Institute of Bioengineering and Nanotechnology in Singapore.  Read More

Blue light has been used to kill potentially-lethal Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria (pictu...

Over the past few years, blue light has allowed us to understand heart problems, control brain functions, and activate muscle tissue. Now, another biomedical function can be added to its list – because it’s known to have antimicrobial qualities, it’s been used to stop infections of the skin and soft tissues.  Read More

IBM's 'ninja polymers' are capable of killing antibiotic-resistant bacteria such as Staphy...

Bacteria such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) can not only cause potentially lethal infections, but they are also unaffected by commonly-available antibiotics. Even when it comes to bacteria that can be more easily controlled, we are still constantly being warned about the danger of them becoming antibiotic-resistant. Now, however, researchers have discovered a new antiobiotic-free method of killing bacteria including MRSA ... and it’s based on semiconductor technology.  Read More

Brown University's Qi Wang swirls a solution of selenium nanoparticles

Although it’s known to kill bacteria, selenium has never been tried as an antibacterial coating for implanted medical devices ... until now, that is. Engineers from Rhode Island’s Brown University have applied coatings of selenium nanoparticles to pieces of polycarbonate – the material used for things like catheters and endotracheal tubes – and then exposed those samples to Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. In some cases, populations of the bacteria were subsequently reduced by up to 90 percent.  Read More

Anitbiotic-resistant bacteria have been discovered in the Carlsbad Caverns National Park (...

Research into the growing emergence of drug-resistant bacteria, could be greatly assisted by the discovery of bacteria from deep within Lechuguilla Cave in New Mexico. The previously unknown strains of bacteria, which have never before been exposed to humans, were found to possess a naturally occurring resistance to multiple types of antibiotics that doctors currently use to treat patients. This means that new forms of bacteria may have been exposed to undiscovered antibiotics which, in turn could be used against currently untreatable infections in the future.  Read More

Looking for something? Search our 28,290 articles