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Alcohol


— Around The Home

Sulfite-filtering Üllo aims to make wine-drinking less whine-inducing

By - July 22, 2015 5 Pictures

Do you get itchy, cramped-up or wheezy from even a little bit of wine? It could be because you have a sulfite sensitivity. Sulfites are sulfur-based compounds that are added in the wine-making process to prevent bacterial growth – they keep the wine from spoiling while it's in transit and storage. Given that they're not needed once the wine has been poured, however, chemist James Kornacki has developed a device for reducing them at that point in the game – it's called the Üllo.

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Walk-in cocktail creates a boozy atmosphere

Have you ever finished work on a Friday and felt like a glass of your favorite tipple simply won't cut it? Well soon you'll be able to have a whole roomful of it. The Alcoholic Architecture bar is a walk-in cocktail that lets guests breathe in a cloud of alcoholic mist. Alcohol is absorbed into the bloodstream via the lungs and eyes.

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— Health and Wellbeing Review

Review: Alcomate Revo brings pro-level alcohol screening to consumers

By - June 4, 2015 10 Pictures

Drunk driving is a serious problem and – despite being conscientious – at a certain point in the evening, trusting one's own judgement means trusting someone who isn't sober enough to make the call. While inexpensive breathalyzers costing less than US$30 are available, they're not the most reliable, while the more professional models need to be sent back to the factory on a regular basis for recalibration. Recently, we got hold of an AlcoMate Revo by AK GlobalTech. The device is aimed at the consumer market, and uses a replaceable sensor module that eliminates the need for recalibration. We put it through its paces.

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— Science

Boutique gin boasts all the flavor of 62 forest ants

By - May 20, 2015 2 Pictures
Not so long ago the only things that came in a bottle of alcohol (beside the alcohol itself) were the occasional odds and ends that fell in as it was being made, or some fruit that was deliberately shoehorned in to make it look decorative. Today there seems to be a craze for all sorts of objects jammed into bottles of spirit – scorpions, worms, and other creepy crawlies being particularly common. Actually distilling the essence of an insect to make an alcoholic beverage rather than just pickling it in a bottle, however, is a different prospect altogether. But now a company in the UK has done just that, by using an extract from ants to create a special type of gin. Read More
— Good Thinking

Drink coasters morph into portraits of pain to tackle domestic violence in Japan

By - May 15, 2015 4 Pictures

Despite its reputation as one of the safest countries in the world, Japan isn't immune to the problem of violence towards women. And is so often the case, alcohol is often involved. In an effort to raise awareness and force a shift in the attitudes of boozy bar hounds, the Yaocho Bar Group nightspot chain has designed a series of coasters with portraits of Japanese women that reveal facial injuries in reaction to having cold drinks placed on them.

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— Good Thinking

Sweat-analyzing AlcoStop system could thwart would-be drunk drivers

By - April 22, 2015 1 Picture
There are already in-vehicle systems that keep people from driving while intoxicated, although most of them require users to blow into a breathalyzer. The prototype AlcoStop system, however, takes a less intrusive approach – it measures users' blood alcohol levels by analyzing their sweat via built-in sensors, and won't allow the car to start if those levels indicate that they're too drunk to drive. Read More
— Telecommunications

Smart whiskey bottle talks to smartphones

By - February 26, 2015 1 Picture
Diageo, the alcohol giant behind popular poisons like Smirnoff and Baileys, has teamed up with electronics company Thinfilm Electronics to develop a Johnnie Walker Blue Label smart whiskey bottle. The prototype connected bottle promises to enable distributors to better track stock as well as connect with user's smartphones and detect when someone has cracked it open prematurely. Read More
— Science

Love hormone shows promise as a sobriety pill by helping drunken rats see straight

By - February 24, 2015 1 Picture
Oxytocin is often called the "love hormone" due to its role in encouraging social behaviors, love and long-term bonding. Now, scientists have discovered that it might have something to offer those with weak knees of a different kind. Research carried out at the University of Sydney has established that the hormone can curtail the intoxicating effects of alcohol in rats, suggesting that a sobriety pill for humans could one day become a reality. Read More
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