2014 Paris Motor Show highlights

Adhesive

Surrounded by other team members, Achim Oesert from the University of Kiel hangs from the ...

As is so often the case these days for those searching for a better way to stick stuff together, researchers from the Zoological Institute at the University of Kiel in Germany have turned to the biology of gravity-defying ceiling walkers, such as geckos and insects. These creatures served as inspiration for a new dry adhesive tape that not only boasts impressive bonding strength, but can also be attached and detached thousands of times without losing its adhesive properties.  Read More

3M's new Kind Removal Silicone Tape is said to cause less discomfort and skin damage upon ...

When it comes to “painless” bandages, many of us might assume that they’re designed mainly for children, who simply don’t like the sting that comes with the removal of conventional products. The fact is, however, that approximately 1.5 million patients in U.S. health care facilities receive skin injuries caused by bandage removal every year. Many of these patients are elderly, require repeated tapings in the same area, or have fragile skin for other reasons. It’s for people like these that 3M designed its new Kind Removal Silicone Tape.  Read More

Leaf beetles use three shapes of adhesive hair in a specific pattern to allow for greater ...

Few things are as disconcerting, or as curious, as the sight of a gecko or spider skittering effortlessly upside down along the ceiling. This ability is known to be facilitated by microscopic hairs or "setae" on the footpads of insects and mammals and a better understanding of their function could lead to advances in synthetic adhesives, wall climbing robots and yes, even the the holy-grail of the spiderman suit. Now for the first time, scientists studying leaf beetles have been able to measure the adhesive force from single setae in a live animal and in the process expand our knowledge of the role they play in clinging to diverse surfaces.  Read More

The healing process demonstrated in the caoutchouc tree-inspired elastomer (Photo: Fraunho...

When the caoutchouc tree is damaged, liquid latex containing capsules of the protein hevein escapes from inside of it. Those capsules rupture, releasing the hevein, which links the latex particles together and ultimately closes up the wound. The whole bursting/sealing-microcapsules thing is obviously a pretty good idea, as it has been put to use in human technology such as self-healing concrete, electronics, paint and aircraft epoxy resin. Now, German researchers have copied the caoutchouc tree’s modus operandi to create a self-sealing elastic polymer.  Read More

A mussel, with fibers of the synthetic adhesive gel attached to it (Photo: Tara Fadenrecht...

Mussels are remarkable creatures, not only in how good they taste steamed and buttered, but also in their ability to cling to rocks that are pounded by ocean waves. Their tenacious grip comes courtesy of byssal holdfast fibers that are secreted by the mussels themselves. Last year, scientists from Germany’s Max Planck Institute for Colloids and Interfaces analyzed these fibers in an effort to determine how they were able to maintain their brute strength, while also giving slightly to avoid snapping. This week, scientists from the University of Chicago announced that they have been able to replicate the fibers, producing an adhesive that could be used on underwater machinery, as a surgical adhesive, or as a bonding agent for implants.  Read More

A model zeolite molecule, illustrating its porous structure and large inner surface area (...

It has been estimated that up to 85 percent of all wood materials (such as particleboard or plywood) contain adhesives that in turn contain formaldehyde, and the World Health Organization has classified formaldehyde as a carcinogen. Unfortunately, it’s not enough to simply avoid eating those wood products – even the fumes given off by formaldehyde have been shown to pose a health hazard. Many people turn to keeping spider plants in their homes or offices, as they help neutralize airborne toxins, but now help could be coming from another source. German researchers have discovered that by adding special minerals to wood adhesives, those adhesives themselves can help clean the air.  Read More

Geckos inspire electronics-printing technique

A team of engineers has formulated a new method of adhesion based on a natural phenomena found in geckos. Inspired by the gecko’s ability to stick to any kind of surface and easily un-stick itself, the engineers from Northwestern University and the University of Illinois have developed a new reversible adhesion stamp. The team created a square polymer stamp that can easily transport an array of electronic devices and print them onto a diverse range of complex surfaces including clothing, plastics and leather.  Read More

Paul Day and Alan Asbeck worked on adhesives for the feet of the gecko-like Stickybot (Ima...

The biology of a gecko’s foot that gives the lizard its remarkable climbing ability has been used by engineers at Stanford University to create a robot that can climb smooth surfaces including a wall of slick glass. With feet modeled on the intricate design of gecko toes, the Stickybot could lead to the development of robots that can scale vertical surfaces to access dangerous or hard to reach places.  Read More

Potentially toxic petroleum-based wood adhesives may soon give way to safer soy-based glue...

Two thousand years ago Jesus may have walked on water, but soon we may be walking on food. In a bid to become more environmentally sustainable, scientists have unveiled a new "green" alternative to commonly used petroleum-based wood adhesives. Representatives from the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Forest Products Laboratory in Wisconsin, speaking at this week's 240th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society, talked about the development of a soy-based glue. The substance is derived from food products such as soy milk and tofu, and could mean a new generation of eco-friendly flooring, furniture, cabinets and other wood products.  Read More

In the search for a hot-melt composite adhesive Professor Kaichang Li noticed a sticky res...

It happens often in research. While looking for one thing, scientists stumble across another. In this case, researchers at Oregon State University's College of Forestry were looking for an elusive wood-based adhesive that would be solid at room temperature but melt when the heat was turned up. What they stumbled upon was an easily produced, environmentally benign, pressure sensitive adhesive which holds the potential to be cheaply produced from a wide range of vegetable oils.  Read More

Looking for something? Search our 28,966 articles