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3D

Confocal microscope image of the artificial neural tissue developed at Tufts University

One approach to studying the brain rather than working on the whole thing at once is to examine small bits of it. With that in mind, researchers at the Tissue Engineering Resource Center at Tufts University, Boston have developed a three-dimensional brain-like tissue that is structurally similar to living rat brain tissue, functions enough like it for experimental purposes, and one that scientists have been able to keep alive for up to two months.  Read More

Using a US$40 needle, the scientists created a 3D microscope capable of creating images wi...

Beginning with a US$40 needle, researchers from the University of Utah have designed a microscope with the ability to generate miniaturized 3D images. The low-cost device is capable of producing images around 70 times smaller than the width of a human hair, a development that could offer new insights into how particular proteins in the brain function.  Read More

OVA Studio's Swimarium is a swimming pool surround by LED screen on which footage from div...

If you've ever fancied scuba diving at the Great Barrier Reef but can't afford it, this idea from OVA Studio might provide a solution. The Swimarium design sees LED screens placed all around a pool to create an immersive virtual swimming experience.  Read More

An original photo of a paper crane (left) and an artificially-rotated version of it

Many people are already annoyed when characters on TV cop shows "zoom in and enhance" on a photo, to reveal a level of detail that could never really have been captured by the camera. Thanks to software developed at Carnegie Mellon University, however, it's now possible to actually turn objects in a photo around ... seemingly revealing sides of them that were facing away from the camera when the picture was taken.  Read More

Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have devised a method for large-scale 3D motion ...

It might soon be possible to perform large-scale 3D motion reconstructions of sporting events or other live performances, thanks to new research by scientists at Carnegie Mellon University. The researchers mounted 480 video cameras in a two-story geodesic dome that enabled them to track the motion of events such as a man swinging a baseball bat or confetti being thrown into the air.  Read More

The CSIRO's HeatWave is a handheld 3D thermal imaging prototype

Thermal imaging has proven itself to be a useful adjunct to physical testing in areas including engineering, health, and agriculture. Until now, however, conventional 3D thermal imaging use has largely been restricted due to the specialized technical knowledge required to operate it and interpret the results. To address this, Australia's CSIRO has developed a prototype tool called HeatWave that is a lightweight, high-resolution 3D scanner that is claimed to be not only easy to carry, but easy to use as well.  Read More

The Striker II helmet packs the latest tracking and night vision capabilities

This week at the Farnborough Airshow, BAE Systems showed off its latest Helmet-Mounted Display (HMD), the Striker II flight helmet. The unit not only provides a digital, visor-projected night vision system that is equivalent or better than current HMD systems, but it has also seen a weight reduction for greater safety and comfort.  Read More

The MirrorBox projects 3D-mapped images onto solid objects

Advertising is a bit like an arms race, with businesses competing with one another in a never-ending battle for the eyes and ears of consumers. The latest salvo in this Don Draper war is the MirrorBox, billed as "the world's first projection-mapped display unit." Built by DisplayMapper, a division of London-based Projection Artworks, the MirrorBox is a self-contained projection system designed for retail spaces and points of sale that projects stereographically-mapped images onto three-dimensional objects.  Read More

A new 3D display should reduce the eye strain currently associated with devices like Googl...

Researchers at the University of Arizona and the University of Connecticut have developed a technology for augmented reality devices that superimposes data over three dimensions rather than two. The technique makes the user experience much more seamless and vastly reduces eye strain, making AR devices more attractive for long-term use.  Read More

The new MIT 3D system doesn't need glasses to work

The 3D format has had something of a renaissance in recent years, but the technology still has some way to go before the potential of "real-life" multiperspective 3-D can be realized. The Camera Culture group at the MIT Media Lab is developing a new 3D video projection system that doesn't require glasses and provides different users different perspective angles of the same object. The team sees it not as a final answer, but as a transitional system that sits between current technologies and true holographic video.  Read More

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