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3D Scanners

Now that you can be scanned and 3D-printed in miniature form, two-dimensional portraits seem so last century. Of course, this novelty is way more expensive than a photograph, but now a company called Twinkind located in Hamburg, Germany is offering a 3D portrait service where the lengthy scanning process has been made as quick and painless as having a photo taken. You can even scan your pets, as they don't need to stay still for 20 minutes at a time! Read More
The need for true-to-life digital objects is accelerating as visual effects studios outbid themselves into bankruptcy, game studios build increasingly realistic AAA titles, and the art world begins to digitally preserve priceless artifacts for future generations. A 3D scanner can generate digital models of real world objects quickly and easily, and that's where Creaform's Go!SCAN 3D finds its niche. Read More
While 3D printers are gradually becoming more popular, their possibilities are limited if you lack the skills to create custom 3D models. This has led to a surge in the development of user-friendly 3D software, as well as affordable 3D scanners that can digitize real world objects. Matterform's Photon 3D scanner is the latest and most affordable example to be launched via a successful crowdfunding campaign. Read More
It wasn’t that long ago that constructing 3D models was a painstaking and time-consuming task. These days, devices such as the Lynx A camera are turning it into a point and shoot affair. Microsoft is also doing its bit to make life easier for graphic artists, 3D printing aficionados, industrial designers, animators, architects, and games developers by turning its Kinect for Windows sensor to the task of generating 3D models of objects and environments. Read More
Computer models are typically created by specialists using dedicated CAD software or animation packages. The more detailed the object, the more time and experience it takes to make it. One shortcut would be to scan a real life version of the desired object (if it exists), but 3D scanners are generally expensive, bulky machines that aren't practical for the average person. The advent of affordable, desktop-sized 3D scanners like the CADScan3D could change all that – and presents troubling legal issues for the growing maker movement. Read More
It may look like a rather beefy tablet, but the Lynx A is actually a device that could make life easier for graphic artists, animators, architects, 3D printing enthusiasts, and potentially quite a few other people. Putting it simply, it’s a point-and-shoot camera that creates digital 3D models of whatever it’s pointed at. Read More

Makerbot is holding the grand opening of its first retail store today, and it has partnered with ShapeShot to provide a novel 3D photo booth. The system uses digital cameras to capture your mug from a variety of positions, which it analyzes to create a three-dimensional model. The process only takes a few minutes and costs just five dollars. Visitors can have 3D prints made at the store, including a bust of their very own face. Read More

3-D modelling is maturing fast. Increasingly affordable solutions are not only raising general awareness of 3D workflows but revolutionizing design, engineering and manufacturing processes. The case in point is German-based David-laserscanner - a system that lets users turn everyday objects into 3D models at a low cost. Read More

In the past, we've seen 3D scanning widely used in a variety of industries - clothing retail, law enforcement, medical education, etc. - but it's still a little surprising to see the same technology applied to a slab of meat. Nantsune's new Libra 165C meat slicer does exactly that however, capturing a 3D image of a piece of meat, ready to be butchered, and then using the data to make slices at the same precise weight every time. Read More

The human implications for living in a world with UAVs are very much dependent on one's latitude and longitude at any given time. Though the term is likely to conjure images of covert military operations, it's not a connotation that the term, or the technology, necessarily implies. Fundamentally, a UAV is merely an unpiloted flying machine, and that's a potentially useful thing to have for all sorts of civilian applications. It's already happening. Exhibit A: research at the University of Granada into using small UAVs, equipped with cameras, that scan buildings in order to construct 3D models. Read More
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