Top 100: The most desirable cars of all time

Kryptonite superglue reduces open chest surgery recovery time

By

October 27, 2010

Kryptonite provides five to ten times the mechanical strength of the breastbone closure of...

Kryptonite provides five to ten times the mechanical strength of the breastbone closure of steel wires, yet takes only about five minutes to complete (Photo: University of Calgary)

Image Gallery (3 images)

Stories about Kryptonite are sure to pique interest, and this one has both a "super" and a scientific angle. Canadian researchers are using a super glue called Kryptonite to create a stronger closure of the breastbone for heart patients after open chest surgery. This means faster recovery time, fewer complications and less post-operative pain.

The Kryptonite adhesive bonds quickly and effectively to the breastbone, allowing it to become solid in just hours, shortening the current recovery time of eight weeks by 50 per cent. It provides five to ten times the mechanical strength of the breastbone closure of the standard steel wires, yet takes only about five minutes to complete.

Enhanced bone stability results in fewer complications such as wound infections and bone separation. There have been no associated side effects or complications with Kryptonite after one year of follow-up.

Dr. Paul Fedak pioneered the Kryptonite chest closure procedure (Photo: University of Calg...

Kryptonite has properties like natural bone and allows for new bone growth.

Patients also experience significantly less pain than with the steel closure, meaning fewer painkillers are required and breathing is much easier and more comfortable, so patients get back to walking and regular activities more quickly.

The Kryptonite procedure was developed by Dr. Paul Fedak, a cardiac surgeon at Foothills Hospital Medical Centre in Calgary, Alberta. It has been used on over 500 patients across Canada and the United States, and a larger clinical trial will now be implemented.

With 1.4 million open chest surgeries performed each year around the world, the procedure has the potential to revolutionize surgical recovery.

Now that's something even Superman would get excited about.

Tags
2 Comments

How do they keep the bone approximated during those first few hours after gluing?

matthew.rings
28th October, 2010 @ 06:05 pm PDT

@mattew.rings

I would imagine it probably goes off in a few minutes, similar to current bone cements, an then reaches hardness in a few hours. So they probably mix it, allow it to almost set, apply it while the bone is approximated let it set, and then suture the layers of tissue.

Facebook User
2nd November, 2010 @ 04:32 am PDT
Post a Comment

Login with your gizmag account:

Or Login with Facebook:


Related Articles
Looking for something? Search our 29,877 articles
Recent popular articles in Medical
Product Comparisons