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Stafier's solar roof tiles appear wafier thin

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July 5, 2013

Stafier's PV roof tile system recesses into the roof

Stafier's PV roof tile system recesses into the roof

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If aesthetic concerns are keeping you from buying some solar panels to stick on your roof, Stafier's expansion into photovoltaics may be of interest. As phrases go "support system" is about as exciting as sniffing cardboard, but though that is what this is, the upshot is that the solar panels are more or less flush to the surrounding tiles, keeping your roof's even apperance.

Though they appear to be extremely thin PV panels, they are in fact set into the roof, replacing the tiles that were there. The Dutch company claims the system works with more or less any sort of roof, and uses aluminum sheets to create a seal between your solar panels and ordinary tiles. A panel the size of four tiles can generate up to 55 W of electrical power.

A single panel is four tiles in size and can generate up to 55 W of electrical power

According to Red Dot, which recently gave Stafier a design award for the product, the system has been tested under rainstorm conditions in a wind tunnel and found to be weatherproof (you'd hope, wouldn't you?). A ventilation system built into the rear of the tile helps keep them cool, as though PV panels like light, heat actually compromises their efficiency.

Sources: Stafier, Red Dot, via Inhabitat

About the Author
James Holloway James lives in East London where he punctuates endless tea drinking with freelance writing and meteorological angst. Unlocking Every Extend Extra Extreme’s “Master of Extreme” achievement was the fourth proudest moment of his life.   All articles by James Holloway
10 Comments

Neat! Now if they can bring out a version shaped like steel roofing sheets, they will sell many, many more.

The Skud
7th July, 2013 @ 08:39 pm PDT

I also think it could be a great way to keep the design of ones house and still have solar panels. I think it would be really good for new construction where one can design the roof to accomodate it. I give it two green thumbs up. :)

BigWarpGuy
8th July, 2013 @ 09:52 am PDT

More connection points means more potential points of failure. My biggest concern (besides hail) is how well the roof detail will hold up over time.

Bruce H. Anderson
8th July, 2013 @ 11:41 am PDT

So the new selling point for these solar panels is: Ours look better, not cost less, not more efficient, but fit flush on the roof. When did aerodynamics become important?

Would ventilation be necessary if they used an IR reflective coating? Or turned the IR into electricity?

I'll wait for solar to have a payback time of 5 years. That's all I care about.

Don Duncan
8th July, 2013 @ 12:01 pm PDT

If heat is such a factor, why are the damned things always so black?

WhyEyeWine
8th July, 2013 @ 12:08 pm PDT

The issue is NOT design or aerodynamics it is WEIGHT. The number one reason besides cost for not doing solar panels is that the conventional "panels" are HUGELY heavy and often need an architect to do a full weight analysis prior to installation. Here in hurricane zones the added weight is enough to disallow the use and we are the PERFECT area to have solar (I live in Orlando) but for the weight issues. These new tiles could easily be a game changer except I can't find them here in the USA yet.

Dr D
8th July, 2013 @ 02:48 pm PDT

Mass produce if doable & cut weight so not to effect roof.

Stephen N Russell
8th July, 2013 @ 06:06 pm PDT

How well do they hold up to leaves, limbs, cats and squirrels? If I need to go up on the roof to fetch a Frisbee, can I without them being damaged? Just keeping it real.

Cecil Hutchins
9th July, 2013 @ 10:57 am PDT

Looks promising. Wonder how they compare to Dow Solar tiles. Aesthetics are a huge issue in my mind and I will definitely buy something like this for my next roof.

Sheryl Hamlin
9th July, 2013 @ 08:42 pm PDT

Oh my, I never thought it was possible. Had I known I would have held back on my purchase. I'll just have to readjust my roof (like that's gonna be easy). Aesthetics aside, does anyone know how these fare in terms of heat compared to conventional PV panels?

Bill M
22nd July, 2013 @ 07:08 pm PDT
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