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Sporty Supaheroe cycle jacket boasts "intelligent" sensors and dynamic LEDs

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February 27, 2012

The Utope Project's Sporty Supaheroe integrates sensors and RGB LEDs into an 'intelligent'...

The Utope Project's Sporty Supaheroe integrates sensors and RGB LEDs into an 'intelligent' cycle jacket

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When it comes to cycling apparel, it's right that style plays second fiddle to safety. But if high visibility can be achieved without making the ultimate sartorial sacrifice, so much the better. With its Sporty Supaheroe cycling jacket, the Utope Project aims to achieve just that - integrating 64 RGB LEDs into its stretchable, wearable circuit boards. And the inclusion of in-built sensors means the LED array can display a variety of patterns depending on circumstance.

Together, an integrated "acceleration sensor" and gyroscope track the cyclist's movement, conveying information for all to see on the jacket itself. Conceivably, this means that the jacket's rear panels could glow red under braking, or flash on one side if the cyclist moves sideways. A particularly nice touch is a smartphone call alert system, which we gather employs a simple light sensor in the jacket's inner pocket wired to the jackets outer LEDs. When an incoming call is received your smartphone screen lights up, triggering the sensor and LEDs. That said, anything that makes a telephone harder to ignore when cycling should be used with caution.

The jacket is made of organic cotton with additional water-resistant layers that we gather do not sacrifice the jacket's breathability. It comes in a rather fetching creamy-beige sort of hue, with white webbing over the LED circuits on the upper arms and torso.

The Sporty Supaheroe integrates 64 RGB LEDs into its stretchable, wearable circuit boards

It isn't absolutely clear how the LEDs are driven, but presumably the jacket integrates a battery pack. From the prototype video we've seen, it would appear the jacket incorporates different modes of display. One mode, with white light on the jacket's front panels and red light to the red, is clearly envisaged for road cycling, while in another mode the jacket twinkles like a Christmas tree (raising a few practical safety questions, possibly).

What we haven't seen is precisely how the jacket responds to sensor inputs, and thus just how dynamic the resulting effects are. I'm no safety expert, but one wonders if there's a line between being seen and becoming a distraction. Still, it's a compelling concept in an attractive design. It'll be fascinating to see the finished article - and more importantly, how it behaves.

The Utope Project itself is a collaboration between designer Wolfgang Langeder and the stretchable circuits division of Fraunhofer IZM. The Sporty Supaheroe jacket is part of a menswear collection that the Utope Project is launching this year, though we have not yet received word of exact launch dates and pricing.

Source: the Utope Project

About the Author
James Holloway James lives in East London where he punctuates endless tea drinking with freelance writing and meteorological angst. Unlocking Every Extend Extra Extreme’s “Master of Extreme” achievement was the fourth proudest moment of his life.   All articles by James Holloway
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5 Comments

I don't want my cycling jacket to look like I have glowing sweat stains coming out of my pits, thank you very little.

Facebook User
27th February, 2012 @ 04:12 am PST

"Glowing sweat stains," exactly my instant reaction. Not to mention that "organic cotton" is not exactly my first choice for pavement rash armor.

SeekMocha
27th February, 2012 @ 05:21 pm PST

While we're providing constructive criticism: This isn't going to work very well if you're wearing a back-pack either. I suggest they focus on having the lights on the arms.

Francois Retief
28th February, 2012 @ 04:31 am PST

I agree with the idea of putting the LEDs on the arms - as a recumbent cyclist the seat covers my entire back anyway. But if one wanted to be highly visible, perhaps lights on the legs (well, with long tights, not shorts) would be a better choice, since they are always moving and would thus "pop" more readily in the peripheral vision of a passerby.

Bob Fately
28th February, 2012 @ 08:38 am PST

Selfless Plug, but here is something similar concept I designed a few years back...and the light isn't protruding from your sweat glans! Enjoy.

http://www.douglasschaller.com/?projects=luminelo

Dougimusprime
30th November, 2012 @ 03:46 pm PST
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