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solargorilla portable laptop charger

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September 22, 2008

solargorilla portable laptop charger

solargorilla portable laptop charger

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September 23, 2008 The solargorilla is a portable power solution for laptops and other electronic devices from UK based Powertraveller that provides an off-the-grid recharging option wherever the sun is shining. Able to work as a stand-alone device or in conjunction with the company's more conventional powergorilla portable charger, the clam-shell design solargorilla is geared for outdoor use with its durable, water-resistant, rubberized casing and a design that allows it to be attached to vehicle or tent.

The solargorilla has a 20V power socket out and standard 5V USB socket. It weighs 700g and measures 264 mm x 200 mm x 19 mm and of course, how fast it works depends on the UV intensity at your location.

To ensure you have all the bases covered when there's no sunshine to be had, the solargorilla can be used to charge its battery-based stablemate, the powergorilla. Weighing 631g and measuring 2200 mm x 130 mm x 15 mm the powergorilla's Lithium Polymer battery can be charged in 5-6 hours via a mains outlet or by using the solargorilla, where it's estimated that six hours of strong sunlight will provide half of the full charge. When fully charged, powergorilla provides 2-6 hours of extra power for laptops (16V, 19V or 24V settings are available) or over 20 hours for smaller electronic devices like iPods, sat navs, mobile phones and hand-held game consoles.

The powergorilla can be used to charge more than one device simultaneously and both units ship with a range of connectors to suit different mobile devices. Both products are available now - solargorilla costs £140 and powergorilla costs £150.

Via Powertraveller.

About the Author
Noel McKeegan After a misspent youth at law school, Noel began to dabble in tech research, writing and things with wheels that go fast. This bus dropped him at the door of a freshly sprouted Gizmag.com in 2002. He has been Gizmag's Editor-in-Chief since 2007.   All articles by Noel McKeegan
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