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Snuza Halo movement monitor helps keep your sleeping baby safe

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April 7, 2009

Snuza movement monitor attaches to baby's diaper

Snuza movement monitor attaches to baby's diaper

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April 7, 2009 You know it’s irrational to think that your baby could stop breathing whilst she is sleeping but that doesn’t stop you from checking on her every five minutes. A new baby movement monitor from Snuza could help both of you get a good night’s sleep.

Traditional baby movement monitors are fitted beneath the baby’s mattress but the Snuza Halo monitor attaches directly to the baby’s diaper. You simply turn the unit on and then clip it to the waistband of your baby’s diaper. If the monitor does not detect any movement within 15 seconds the built-in vibrating stimulator will trigger your baby to breathe again, this stimulation is used in many neonatal care units across the world. If a further five seconds passes without movement an audible alarm is triggered.

With each movement, the movement indicator light will flash green. If baby stops moving for 15 seconds, the light will flash yellow and when no movement has been detected for 20 seconds, the light will flash red and the alarm will sound. If contact with the skin is lost an alarm will sound.

Whilst the monitor has a military-grade sensor it is a small and lightweight (30g or approx. 1oz) unit so you can take it anywhere. The materials used in the monitor are hypo-allergenic and of medical-grade quality. Importantly, as the monitor is battery-operated there are no wires or cords and no external power is required.

Snuza Business Manager, Charlotte Wenham said, “There are no wires on the monitor at all, this ensures the baby's limbs or neck can't get caught in cables or straps. It also means there is no risk of babies being electrocuted by mains connections.”

The Snuza Halo has an RRP of USD$189.00, see the website for distributors.

Jude Garvey

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