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Variety is spice of life for second-gen Click & Grow

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March 27, 2013

The Smart Herb Garden features an LED light and capacity for three different plants

The Smart Herb Garden features an LED light and capacity for three different plants

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With sales of more than 50,000 of the first generation of its namesake product under its belt, Click & Grow is set to release a second-generation version of its smart pot plant system. Like the original, the new Smart Herb Garden will help take the guesswork out of growing plants indoors but, in response to user feedback, will support the growing of more than one plant at a time and include a built-in light to combat any lack of natural light.

Instead of growing in soil, the Click & Grow system relies on a nanomaterial growth medium designed to provide the optimum amount of nutrients, water and air to the plant roots. Whereas watering causes nutrients to be flushed out of the soil in traditional pot plants, the Click & Grow growth material is embedded throughout with nanocapsules that provide oxygen and nutrients. Water is also absorbed evenly throughout the growth medium.

While the original Click & Grow only allowed the growing of one plant, the new model has three separate beds contained within to support the growing of up to three herbs at once. Like the original, the seeds come in cartridges that are simply slotted into the device. Then all that’s needed is to add water, plug it in and the Smart Herb Garden will do the rest.

The Smart Herb Garden will come in a variety of colors

The mains power is another departure from the original, which ran on four AA batteries. This is due to the addition of the built-in lighting to keep photosynthesis going even in dark and dreary rooms. Two 3 W LED lights shine down on the plants from a stylish arm attached to the side of the device – although the design hasn’t been finalized, so may differ slightly from the provided images.

The starter kit will come with basil, thyme and lemon balm cartridges, with refill cartridges for chili pepper, mini tomato, peppermint, spinach, salad rocket, various varieties of lettuce and strawberries also available.

While the company has created a prototype, it is taking to crowdfunding to get the device production-ready. If successful, the Smart Herb Garden is expected to retail for US$79. However, backers who get in early can score a white one with three plant cartridges included for $39. Other colored lids are available at higher tiers and units are expected to ship in September of this year.

The Smart Herb Garden Kickstarter video pitch can be viewed below.

Source: Click & Grow via Kickstarter

About the Author
Darren Quick Darren's love of technology started in primary school with a Nintendo Game & Watch Donkey Kong (still functioning) and a Commodore VIC 20 computer (not still functioning). In high school he upgraded to a 286 PC, and he's been following Moore's law ever since. This love of technology continued through a number of university courses and crappy jobs until 2008, when his interests found a home at Gizmag.   All articles by Darren Quick
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3 Comments

Do they make one of these that will fit an herb that grows anywhere from 4 ft - 6 ft indoors? This would work for my baby clones but, that is about all.

YukonJack
28th March, 2013 @ 12:45 pm PDT

You can buy a lot of conventional growing equipment for $79. This thing is for people who usually kill plants, and want something to pick right in the kitchen, at a cost of several dollars per ounce.

Grainpaw
2nd April, 2013 @ 11:07 am PDT

Extremely dissatisfied and surpised with such an attitude from the side of click and grow team! On January 24th I placed an order, 116.17 USD was charged from my credit card by the Estonian office. So far I havent received my order, morover I HAVENT's RECEIVED ANY REPLY to my several emails and complaints (via email, via feedback at the click and grow web-site), not a word!!!

Tatiana Savelyeva
5th April, 2013 @ 03:09 am PDT
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