If there's a new way to apply manual power toward motivating a set of scooter or bicycle wheels, someone will think of it. We've seen stair stepper-style scooters, dog-drawn scooters, elliptical machine scooters, gravity-fired hike-a-bikes and countless other designs. The SkiMotion uses a butterfly leg motion, among others, and gets your upper body involved.

SkiMotion is a scooter with two individual legs that are independently linked to the front tube. The legs pivot outward for moving and collapse inward for storage and transport. The vertical front tube also folds down, making for a small, portable footprint.

SkiMotion says that the movements involved in powering the scooter are similar to inline skating, ski slalom and traditional kick scooters. In fact, the SkiMotion allows for five different styles of motion and exercise: butterfly, cambering, skating, ski motion and cross country ski training. Its listed top speed is 17 mph (27.4 km/h).

I took a SkiMotion out for a brief lap around a paved path, and I found getting started a little like doing half-splits. You extend your two legs outward, and the swivel-mounted wheels transform that energy into forward motion. The four-point pivot hub up front allows you to get your upper body involved, powering into turns and carving up hills.

The SkiMotion uses sturdy steel construction. Its 200-mm (7.9-in) front wheel is about double the size of each rear wheel, a design that SkiMotion says is aimed at stability and control. The bike is equipped with cantilever brakes on each wheel and includes two adjustable brake levers.

The SkiMotion is already available in Asia. It will launch in the United States in October. The adult version, which weighs 26.5 pounds (12 kg) and supports riders up to 200 pounds (90 kg) will retail for US$289. A smaller child's version (up to 155 lbs/70 kg) will also be available for $239. That price includes an optional set of LED rear wheels.

The video below gives you an idea of what's involved in riding a SkiMotion.

Source: Ride SkiMotion