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High-tech handcuffs can shock, inject prisoners

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December 14, 2012

Scottsdale Inventions' shocking handcuffs

Scottsdale Inventions' shocking handcuffs

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Today, handcuffs are just steel restraints. Tomorrow, however, they could be much more. According to U.S. Patent Application 20120298119, Scottsdale Inventions, LLC of Paradise Valley, Arizona has invented a pair of high-tech handcuffs that could deliver electric shocks to prisoners by means of an incorporated Taser-like system hooked to wireless controls and sophisticated sensors.

In some ways, the Scottsdale cuffs are like a combination of invisible fences and training collars used for dogs. Where the canine versions provide a mild joy buzzer of a shock, however, the cuffs could immobilize a prisoner. They're based on the principle of the Taser, which uses electrodes to administer high-voltage, low amperage shocks to disrupt a person’s voluntary nervous system. In this case, the system is part of a pair of handcuffs, though the company says that it could also be used in an ankle cuff, restraining belt, straitjacket, harness, facial restraint, helmet or neck collar.

Shock cuffs and accessories
Shock cuffs and accessories

The Scottsdale cuffs are more than just a shocking device. They are part of a system for exercising an almost frightening degree of control over single or multiple prisoners. The cuffs could not only shock, but also deliver warnings if the prisoner fails to follow instructions. These warnings might be an audible signal, a vibration, a flashing light or a mild electric shock as a prelude to a more severe jolt if not obeyed.

The cuffs are also programmable. They could be set to respond to radio transmitters so that prisoners must remain in a certain areas, avoid other areas or only move in a prescribed zone. They could also be triggered by RFID tags attached to weapons, vehicles or other items detainees aren't allowed near.

Exclusion zone option for the shock cuffs
Exclusion zone option for the shock cuffs

In addition to radio proximity sensors, the cuffs could include an accelerometer, inclinometer, potentiometer, location sensing device, microphone, camera, a biometric sensor or a combination of devices. These could not only allow guards to keep track of prisoners, but also allow the cuffs to automatically deliver a shock if they detect violent or aggressive movements or even if the detainee shouts.

Aside from their deterrent functions, the Scottsdale cuffs could also keep track of prisoner movements, behavior and number of shocks administered, plus they include safety cutouts to prevent administration of an injurious or fatal jolt. In a truly Orwellian twist, the cuffs could also release gases, liquids, dyes and even inject the prisoner with sedative drugs.

Source: PatentBuddy via Patent Bolt

About the Author
David Szondy David Szondy is a freelance writer based in Monroe, Washington. An award-winning playwright, he has contributed to Charged and iQ magazine and is the author of the website Tales of Future Past.   All articles by David Szondy
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35 Comments

Might as well be a shock collar.

Tom Arr
14th December, 2012 @ 03:26 pm PST

This is seriously scary.

Joel Detrow
14th December, 2012 @ 03:55 pm PST

am i the only one who finds all such efforts at enhansing the tools of authoritarianism and tyranny disturbing?

hourglass
14th December, 2012 @ 04:29 pm PST

hourglass: yep, the rest of us are fine with this.

Tim Lawton
14th December, 2012 @ 08:05 pm PST

This is bad. This is bad and wrong...

promet
14th December, 2012 @ 08:33 pm PST

Although this seems like a scary device it must be remembered that it is only a concept and will probably stay at this stage. There are thousands of dangerous, inhumane and plain stupid patents out there.

SAND MAN
15th December, 2012 @ 02:08 am PST

Amnesty International will be delighted. Not.

http://www.amnesty.org/en/library/asset/AMR51/048/1996/en/184256f4-eaf9-11dd-aad1-ed57e7e5470b/amr510481996en.html

sascha.kremers
15th December, 2012 @ 06:06 am PST

What happens if there is a power outage at the transmitter.... Also facial restraint with electro shock?!? I find this story's content obscene.

Sorry Gizmag a very poor choice of a story and content. I come to be inspired by design, not sickened.

j-stroy
15th December, 2012 @ 10:37 am PST

This is a very BAD idea.

"Taser"-type shocks were intended to be a LESS LETHAL (not "safe") means of restraint. They are only supposed to be used when the only other option is deadly force (e.g., shooting the suspect). Putting such a thing in handcuffs defeats the whole purpose, and it becomes instead nothing but a torture device.

According to Amnesty International, which regards tasers today largely as instruments of abuse, tasers are responsible for at least 10,000 deaths worldwide.

And as for "injecting" the prisoner? Illegal as hell. At least in the U.S.

Anne Ominous
15th December, 2012 @ 03:38 pm PST

If Amnesty International hates it, you can guarantee it is an excellent security product to contain violent prisoners.

Hopefully they can be used on the street soon to increase law enforcement's safety and subdue violent offenders faster and easier.

Todd Dunning
15th December, 2012 @ 04:27 pm PST

Hmm, a shock that goes in one arm and out the other...don't suppose any doctors were consulted. They would tell them...that is a no go...zap right through the heart.

Injection...again unlikely to be accepted by doctors. 1. who swabbed? 2. the wrist?...who the heck would inject the wrist. It is all bones...very delicate and important bones at that.

They have plans for what? Did you say a straitjacket? Why would you feel it is necessary to electrocute someone in a straitjacket?

I am pro technology but this is stupid, cruel, dangerous, and sadistic.

If course all the orderlies at the mental asylums and guards at the prisons can't wait to get their hands on these puppies and give them a thorough series of evaluative tests.

Mindbreaker
15th December, 2012 @ 05:56 pm PST

Todd, why wait for it to be used on just violent prisoners, imagine how handy it could be for innocent suspects being taken into custody.. if they get too outraged at being innocently accused, just shock em and shoot some drugs through their system with or without their consent!

As it stands, when I see police, I don't feel confident that they are there to protect me from anything... police are a reactive force they are not a protective force. They can't stop a rape they can only clean up the mess after it's happened... More tools like this in their hands simply means that un-confirmed suspects will be treated worse before they even get a chance to prove their innocence.

The public need to wake up to the fear driven media and take some responsibility for the world we are creating with these reactive, poor judgement decisions to even consider wanting devices like this imposed on society.

Perhaps if the news spent less time promoting fear and some of the more popular shows on TV stopped promoting crimes and disrespectful attitudes towards fellow people, we would not have such a cry for more security to stop the "bad guys" from getting us all.

Murray Smart
15th December, 2012 @ 08:55 pm PST

If you already have someone in cuffs, why do you need to sedate or shock them? They are restrained! Why not just kick them in the ribs a few times as well.

VoiceofReason
16th December, 2012 @ 10:38 am PST

HA!!! yes, getting busted for drug-abuse, just to get drugged even more... Shocking!!!

Michiel Mitchell
16th December, 2012 @ 02:02 pm PST

@ Todd dunning:

That's a joke, right? Police in many parts of the U.S. have already been abusing tasers, using them in lieu of any sort of confrontation, as opposed to in lieu of deadly force, as they were supposed to be.

Tasers are provably NOT "non-lethal"!!! They CAN be and HAVE BEEN lethal, in a significant number of cases.

I will give you the benefit of the doubt and presume you were just joking. But this is no laughing matter. YOUR rights are at stake.

Anne Ominous
16th December, 2012 @ 03:49 pm PST

Whilst they are entitled to their viewpoint I again see the utopian, armchair critics who fail to recognise any of the positive benefits of this device from a law enforcement officers perspective .

Until you have dealt with violent, aggressive, drug or alcohol affected and irrational idiots in our community and try to prevent them harming themselves or innocent folk, your negative comments are naive.

Police and other law enforcement officers are not superhumans and an incident can turn wildly unpredictable and potentially fatal in a second, either during an arrest or afterwards.

The potential effectiveness of this device, used appropriately, can only benefit LE and justice officials. There are medical and ethical considerations but these can be worked through and established.

I comment from the perspective of a 35 year police service veteran

George Krooglik
16th December, 2012 @ 04:28 pm PST

The inevitable incidence of abuse / excess by security forces in open countries, is a much smaller worry than what will happen when such devices make their way into the hands of authoritarian states where there are no systems fo checks and balances.

This will become simply another implement of inflicting pain.. Torture gone high tech..

And then we also have the risk of psychopaths, rapists and the like.. who will switch from duct-tape and tie-wraps to buying these tools from local / online vendors..

Not sure whether this will make the world a safer or more dangerous place.

JCS
17th December, 2012 @ 02:22 am PST

I know some folks in the BDSM scene who would love to get their hands on these.

Otherwise, regardless of their efficacy, I don't think these will pass muster on the basis of "cruel and unusual."

Mayhem
17th December, 2012 @ 02:26 am PST

Very poor design. The inhuman inventor has not incorporated a sharp blade to sever a hand if the miscreant holds up a finger.

Thunderbird4
17th December, 2012 @ 05:07 am PST

"Its happening, you could have stopped it."

D.O.R.A.
17th December, 2012 @ 07:58 am PST

Woe to the person would attempt to put these on ME!

It would be their last act as a breathing person.

That's why I carry a big ass .45 in order to discourage those who would attempt this NO MATTER WHO they are!

Gotcha
17th December, 2012 @ 08:30 am PST

This is the most shockingly inhumane invention I have seen on Gizmag. I think the ACLU should be brought in on this. I assume the Scottsdale inventors are in Scottsdale Arizona. Handcuffs are meant as restraints, not as a form of easy punishment and if you give this power to the mental midgets who have the right to wield it, you will find yet another plethora of human right violations. I have been in handcuffs and to hear the humiliating things they say and feel the humiliating things they do while you are "in custody" is bad enough without giving them the power to shock your wrists, or inject you with some substance or other to enjoy your inability to walk or speak. In my case I happened to be a "goldurn ferner flyin' through Amurca" during the height of the Bush inspired Muslim panic. They mistook me for someone else! As it is I refuse to fly to or through the US ever again, how many more people do you think will adopt the same attitude, when you give your Apes-in-Authority the power to exact this level of abuse?

Starczar
17th December, 2012 @ 08:34 am PST

You guys that bash this device will be praying for one if you have to contain a violent 300lb. murderer who wants to kill you. You'll grow up real quickly, finding that the flower-child act doesn't work every time.

This is the real world, kids. Powerful, dangerous killers actually exist outside Call of Duty. Fortunately for us, you guys aren't responsible for protecting yourselves and the public from them.

That responsibility is held by others who need tools to safely manage the most dangerous individuals in our society. Flowers and unicorns don't.

Todd Dunning
17th December, 2012 @ 11:02 am PST

USPTO.gov: Quote "[0071] ...The portion of the detainee may comprise any body part such as one or more of a wrist, arm, head, leg, finger, ankle, neck, toe, ***GENITALS***, torso and/or waist. ..."

Is it legal to patent torture devices?

Anonymous756
17th December, 2012 @ 11:04 am PST

Yeah, I'm actually really surprised this was catalogued under "Good Thinking" and not "Unethical".

Good job Gizmag.

Justin Derek Murray
17th December, 2012 @ 11:14 am PST

I think its a great idea with the right application .Try a shocking neck collar conected to a lie detector for our politicians .I think this might work

Myopinion
17th December, 2012 @ 12:53 pm PST

Other adds for cuffs:

microcapsule to shoot Mace, pepper spray to subdue inmate & must for CA prisons alone.

Mass produce for Security use 2.

Pvt securty.

Stephen N Russell
17th December, 2012 @ 05:29 pm PST

Hey, I think either the neck collar or the waist belt would be perfect to use on prisoners in a modern day "Chain gang". This way you would only need a minimum number of guards to keep watch over a fairly good size crew, while they work. If one of them runs, they all go down at the push of a button. Just knowing that, if you run, and all of your fellow prisoners are "Tased", the beat down you're going to suffer back in the jail house...well that would be a deterrent!

Why not put them to work in the cities and counties where they are housed; picking up trash and debris along the side of the highways, trimming grass and weeds, maintaining vacant lots, cleaning alley ways, etc... This way the city/county/state can recoup some of the cost to take care of these people.

Why should criminals get to sit around all day on the taxpayers dollar? They get three hots and a cot, a roof over their heads, medical care, an opportunity to advance their education, access to gym equipment, and recreational activities. Hell, they have more rights than the victims of their crimes!

And, there would be additional positions for Corrections Officers, JOBS!

Amnesty International, the AFL-CIO and all those liberal prisoner-rights lawyers can suck it!

If you can't do the time, don't do the crime!

1/2 a bubble off plumb
18th December, 2012 @ 12:05 am PST

I to think people are over-reacting on this. I think this device is great and im left wondering why i didnt think of this myself.

Think of a prisoner whose just been captured or is being transfered somewhere who escapes and is running away on foot, this could stop them or atleast deter them from even trying it.

If you have some 300lb+ guy in handcuffs, he can still over power an average police officer maby even two, especialy if he's all f'd up on drugs or alcohol, most people dont relise how often this stuff happens but its probably happening every second of every day somewhere in america.

Police already have many tools that could and have been used to abuse people, that won't change, but we can't deny them a tool that could save their's or our lives on the basis that a few bad apples will abuse them.

Also you need to understand, everything in this article that mentions the different ways it could be used, or the different things that could be added onto it (like the injection) are only meant to be possibilities of use not how its shipped out, theres no way law enforcment would get injection handcuffs.

Nathaneal Blemings
18th December, 2012 @ 03:58 am PST

these constitute a Crime Against Humanity.

(and are a disgusting rip-off of the movie "Intestinator" and other at will and proximity control devices).

Any user or producer (mfr) should be prosecutable ANYWHERE.

Any resistance to any agency using these is justified - including deadly force.

Not just to the attempted use - any custodial attempts whatsoever.

Every country should provide full sanctuary to anyone subject to this.

(obviously including non-extradiction)

The "slippery slope" may seem gray - but sometimes one must say "no!"

We are all too familiar with horrific norms spread in the name of "civilization".

All truly civilized countries should refuse patent enforcement and issue international warrants for these 'people". If the U.S. balks they (yes, we should be suspended or dropped from interpol and all like agencies.

Barbarism made real.

animals in human form.

nazis and other fascists.

B Gold
18th December, 2012 @ 05:30 am PST

I think you've all missed the next development after this product - why not implant a 'control capsule' into convicted serious offenders which can render an inmate unconscious if they step outside the prison... the vile opportunities for government/state control are limitless.

JPAR
18th December, 2012 @ 09:27 am PST

scary shite! and i'm conservative...

billybob1851
18th December, 2012 @ 03:54 pm PST

Some of you obviously have no idea what you are commenting on, or are extremely disillusioned, have never worked a Correctional facility or dealt with inmates. I have the feeling if I gave the inmates and or convicts a slip of paper for them to sign, promising to behave and not to try and escape you would still find something barbaric and inhumane about it. I have been in Corrections 24 years, I have endured 15 surgeries at the hands of these upstanding, pillars of the community as you are portraying them to be. I have had, s#!t, piss thrown at me, been vomited on, been spit it on. I have had chemicals thrown at me, my food poisoned, been jumped and beaten, almost stabbed and cut on numerous occasions. Apparently that is not barbaric and inhumane behavior according to some of you. I would be willing to bet if I came up to you and spit directly into your eyes and mouth you would try and beat the s#!t out of me, I am not allowed to do that, the inmates can spit in my face all day and I have no recourse except to issue paperwork and place that inmate in a segregation status, the same goes for all of the actions mentioned already, with the exception of being beaten, I am permitted to defend myself, there is a very thin line with respect to the word defend. Anyone want to work with me for a month, I would be interested to see your opinions then.

lt12ncp
24th December, 2012 @ 03:07 am PST

1) Everything this device does (legally) can be done safely now with standard hinged (high security) cuffs, and a location anklet already in use.

2) Anyone other than a doctor, wanting to inject me with anything, better make out his will and testament. That is an assault, I consider life threatening, (as well as illegal) and will defend my life.

3) Running current from arm to arm through the chest, could well be fatal.

Anyone wanting to test that theory on me, SEE COMMENT 2.

4) Anyone ALREADY IN CUFFS, is already a poor threat if properly cuffed with hands behind, and double locked. Hinged cuffs do NOT allow cuffs to be twisted and key holes go away from hands so no picking. (you can't even use a key in that position.)

5) the more complicated any piece of machinery, the higher the cost, and the more likely there will be a malfunction. In this case, malfunctions can kill. This product is a combination of bad ideas.

kellory
26th December, 2012 @ 06:37 pm PST

Anyone who puts a pair of these on a human being should go to prison for a long time.

Randolph Lee
28th December, 2012 @ 12:41 am PST
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