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Computing with the more mature in mind

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July 1, 2009

Big keys on the keyboard, a comfortable to use mouse and a screen with a computer inside -...

Big keys on the keyboard, a comfortable to use mouse and a screen with a computer inside - neat, tidy and easy to use

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The Designed for Seniors Go Computer has been developed for and extensively tested by the more mature among us who are still trying to ignore or simply don't trust the computer age. The computer hardware is behind the monitor to save space and avoid clutter, the keyboard has over-sized keys and bright colors and the system comes with an ergonomic trackball mouse. But it's the user interface which will prove most beneficial to the seniors it was designed to serve.

If you were born well before computers started tightening their grip on our everyday lives you may be one of the many who is still trying desperately hard to ignore them. PCs are more trouble than they're worth. What with all the different kinds of software to setup and maintain, all the cables trailing everywhere and that tiny writing on the screen - they're just too complicated. It's better to do without them altogether. But then your kids or grand-kids visit and want to show you some digital family snaps or help you book a holiday via the Internet or interest you in the latest brain training game. Happily national catalog, magazine and online marketing company firstSTREET have just launched the Designed for Seniors Go computer to help you cope... and even if you've already embraced the digital age, the product may still hold some attraction.

Company CEO Mark Gordon says the Go computer is being marketed to, "that older, often-more skeptical age group that hasn't quite trusted computers and consequently has missed out on the whole wonderful cyberspace world of information, entertainment, communication and connection." The PC has been tested and tweaked by developers and over 10,000 senior citizens in centers throughout the US for the last 8 years to make sure it's both functional and simple to use. All the computer workings are behind the 19-inch flat screen monitor to help cut down on all those cables and save space. The keyboard has large lettering on the keys and important keys are color coded for ease of use. And the system comes with an ergonomic trackball mouse to limit arm movement whilst allowing full onscreen functionality.

Click and Go

But what the seniors will undoubtedly find most beneficial about the computer is its operating interface. Built on top of MS Windows, the Go interface gives access to a host of common functions while keeping the emphasis on simplicity. There's a big Go button at the center top of the screen. Click on this button and a drop down options list will appear, simply clicking on an option takes you straight there. Easy. Alongside the Go button there's a button for printing, one for help and one for zoom magnification (up to 200%). And if you get lost, just click on the Go button again and it'll take you wherever you need to be.

Everything is ready to use out of the box (although to enjoy the full benefits of this PC you will need to have a broadband internet connection already installed and ready to use), firstSTREET claims that it's so simple to get started training manuals and DVDs are not necessary. The company also offers users piece of mind support - Senior Director of merchandising Bud Myers said ahead of the launch, "who else can promise seniors a computer they can't break, crash or confuse; a computer that won't lose what's put into it, that's protected from viruses and spam? What firstSTREET is offering here is basically a failure-free and fear-free computer."

It's available now exclusively from firstSTREET for $799, which is very affordable. The piece of mind support isn't free though and will cost $19.95 per month. As an added incentive to buy, the company offers a 30-day money back guarantee if you're not completely satisfied.

For more information visit the website.

About the Author
Paul Ridden While Paul is loath to reveal his age, he will admit to cutting his IT teeth on a TRS-80 (although he won't say which version). An obsessive fascination with computer technology blossomed from hobby into career before the desire for sunnier climes saw him wave a fond farewell to his native Blighty in favor of Bordeaux, France. He's now a dedicated newshound pursuing the latest bleeding edge tech for Gizmag.   All articles by Paul Ridden
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