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Dews Toothbrush stands up to bathroom nasties

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June 23, 2010

The Dews Toothbrush concept stands alone

The Dews Toothbrush concept stands alone

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From the “so simple it’s a wonder no one has thought of it before” file comes the self-standing Dews Toothbrush from Ryan Harc. With its ability to stand upright, the design offers a simple solution to the problem of where to put a toothbrush without running the risk of covering it in an assortment of germs which will happily make their way to the insides of your mouth next time you brush your teeth.

Just like those Bop Bags that are designed to take a pounding and bounce back up for more, the handle of the Dews Toothbrush is weighted and shaped with a rounded end so that it balances on its base – keeping any microscopic nasties away from the head of the toothbrush. Unfortunately, for all of those driven to paranoia about household germs by advertisements for cleaning products on TV, the Dews Toothbrush is only a concept.

The Dews Toothbrush

However, the Dews Toothbrush designed by Hyun Jin Yoon and Eun Hak Lee took out the Design Concept award in the 2009 Red Dot Awards, so hopefully some toothbrush multinational will sit up (much like the toothbrush itself) and take notice and bring the concept to the dental care aisle of supermarkets in the not too distant future.

Via: Yanko Design.

About the Author
Darren Quick Darren's love of technology started in primary school with a Nintendo Game & Watch Donkey Kong (still functioning) and a Commodore VIC 20 computer (not still functioning). In high school he upgraded to a 286 PC, and he's been following Moore's law ever since. This love of technology continued through a number of university courses and crappy jobs until 2008, when his interests found a home at Gizmag.   All articles by Darren Quick
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6 Comments

Teethbrush wobble but they don't fall down! ;)

This design wouldn't make a difference in bacteria on the bristles, but it would keep other dirt from getting on them.

Watch that Mythbusters episode where they did the experiment with toothbrushes in the bathroom. You can also watch them blow it when they invalidate the control brush by bringing it into the bathroom to wet it for its bacterial test.

The rest of the experiment is pretty shaky too because they brought every brush in the bathroom to the same point (the sink) to wet them each day. Would've been better to use a spray bottle of water brought in from outside the bathroom to spritz them all, then take the brushes out of the bathroom to scrub them on the culture dishes individually.

Facebook User
23rd June, 2010 @ 02:16 pm PDT

One of the nice things about a toothbrush is that they are really cheap. Meaning, you can go to a Costco and get a 12 pack for like ten bucks! I certainly don't see this toothbrush going for a price like that. I'll stick with my Braun powered brush thank you!

Ed
23rd June, 2010 @ 04:02 pm PDT

With the amount of good thinking done in the bathroom it is a little surprising it hasn't been thought of sooner ;) Well either that or thought of and discarded.

Either way, it shows that someone is always thinking about some aspect of our lives :)

Craig Jennings
23rd June, 2010 @ 08:16 pm PDT

Or you can just put the toothbrush upright in a cup like so many other people. Also, anyone who uses any of the various electric or ultrasonic toothbrushes will not have this problem.

Gadgeteer
27th June, 2010 @ 05:41 pm PDT

What happens when little Billy knocks your electric toothbrush over Spirit?

Infanticide sounds cute but is very bad.

And this will be an electric toothbrush as well apparently.

Having note paper which didn't stick to things used to be a small problem.

Craig Jennings
28th June, 2010 @ 02:47 am PDT

Yawn. Got one already, made in rough white ceramic circa 1890. Actually it is superior to this one, as there is an aperture at the base of each channel to allow the goo drooling off each brush to escape, thus allowing drying which assists bacteria death. Only problem is that is made for 19th century toothbrushes which were thinner, so modern ones will not fit.

Doug MacLeod
29th June, 2010 @ 03:06 am PDT
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