Shopping? Check out our latest product comparisons

A bike rack that sucks – in a good way

By

November 10, 2010

SeaSucker racks attach to your vehicle using nothing but rubber vacuum cups

SeaSucker racks attach to your vehicle using nothing but rubber vacuum cups

Image Gallery (7 images)

If you’ve ever tried to install a rooftop or rear-end bike rack on your car, then you’ll know what a hassle it can be. You have to put the thing together, carefully line everything up, run the hooks under your roofline or hatch, then try to tighten it all down simultaneously so everything doesn’t get pulled to one side. According to the folks at SeaSucker, however, their racks attach and come off in seconds, thanks to an attachment system that involves nothing but rubber cups.

SeaSucker racks attach to your vehicle using nothing but rubber vacuum cups

The bike racks are a spin-off of SeaSucker’s marine products, which are used for attaching things such as rod holders and diving racks to boats. The company is quick to point out that their system uses vacuum cups, as opposed to suction cups. What’s the difference? Suction cups are the generally-unreliable little things that are used for sticking aquarium heaters to glass, translucent decorations to windows, and things like that. Vacuum cups, on the other hand, attach themselves to smooth surfaces using a built-in pump with enough force to allow people to climb up the sides of buildings.

To use the racks, you moisten the underside of each cup, put it in place, then click on the pump button to suck it down. To remove it, you just lift a tab to release the air. The pump button also has a red line which will start to become visible if the cup loses pressure after being attached for a while.

SeaSucker racks attach to your vehicle using nothing but rubber vacuum cups

The racks are available in rooftop, hatchback, trunk, or pick-up bed configurations, and hold one to three bikes, depending on the rack model. The company also offers a rather clever work stand, that consists of a traditional bicycle frame clamp attached to a mount that sucks onto the wall.

SeaSucker bike racks are available from the company website, at prices ranging from US$146.99 to $629.99.

Via Dirt Rag.

About the Author
Ben Coxworth An experienced freelance writer, videographer and television producer, Ben's interest in all forms of innovation is particularly fanatical when it comes to human-powered transportation, film-making gear, environmentally-friendly technologies and anything that's designed to go underwater. He lives in Edmonton, Alberta, where he spends a lot of time going over the handlebars of his mountain bike, hanging out in off-leash parks, and wishing the Pacific Ocean wasn't so far away.   All articles by Ben Coxworth
Tags
5 Comments

I drive a Civic,and occasionally,I need the capacity of a pick-up to haul stuff.It would be neat if this system could be used to install a rack or box on the roof or over the truck for oversized loads.

michael_dowling
11th November, 2010 @ 08:07 am PST

I wonder how firmly windows are attached to the frame of the car. Presumably the mounts were never designed to take those sort of stresses. Just a thought....

warren52nz
11th November, 2010 @ 12:16 pm PST

now *THIS* is a good idea!

Ed
11th November, 2010 @ 10:35 pm PST

Nice idea however at over $140 a pop I wonder how long it would be before someone walked off with it & my bike

Rob Wharton
12th November, 2010 @ 03:13 pm PST

Somehow, when I'm driving down the freeway at 80mph with a $1,500 bike on the roof, firmly clamped at 3 points into a rack that's hooked into my roof frame with 4 ratcheting tighteners - I can't imagine being comfortable with nothing but vacuum cups holding it in place.

SeekMocha
6th February, 2012 @ 11:26 am PST
Post a Comment

Login with your gizmag account:

Or Login with Facebook:


Related Articles
Looking for something? Search our 27,759 articles