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Science

Space

International Space Station completes its 100,000th orbit

Having spent over 17 years in low-Earth orbit (LEO) the International Space Station (ISS) has completed its 100,000th lap of planet Earth. At this point the station, which has been permanently manned since the year 2000, has traveled over 2,643,342,240 miles (4,254,046,974 km) through the near perfect vacuum of space – the equivalent of 10 round trips to Mars.
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Space

Testing the world's blackest material in orbit

A cutting edge light retardant coating designed to reduce the interference to the delicate optical equipment mounted on space probes is being put through its paces aboard the Kent Ridge 1 satellite, which launched into low-Earth orbit (LEO) in Dec. 2015. Known as Vantablack S-VIS, it is hoped that the high performance and versatility of the material will allow for the design of lighter, more compact satellite hardware.Read More

Environment

Coffee grounds recycled as sustainable road material

Melbourne folk do love their coffee, and one day the beverage mightn't be just pepping them up for a day's work but paving the way for their trip into the office. Swinburne University researchers have scoured the campus' cafes for coffee grounds and used them as part of the mix for a more sustainable road construction material.Read More

Science

Google Glass-based system identifies you by the sound of your skull

Google Glass may be pretty much dead, but smartglasses in some form are likely to be a part of our future (whether near or distant). When that day comes you don't want just anyone picking up yours and using it without permission. Conventional passwords are one way to go, but scientists from Germany's Saarland University and University of Stuttgart have developed an alternative that doesn't involve having to memorize anything – you do, however, have to let the glasses buzz your skull.Read More

Space

Metal-poor galaxy could help test the Big Bang theory

A team of astronomers has discovered a faint blue dwarf galaxy nicknamed Leoncino or the "little lion," that could be used as a tool to test the Big Bang Theory. The little lion is the most metal-poor galaxy ever discovered, meaning that it could act as a time capsule, allowing scientists to glimpse the conditions prevailing soon after the creation of our universe.
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