Computational creativity and the future of AI

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Biohacking group Science for the Masses has been experimenting with night vision eye drops...

It sounds like something from a science-fiction movie, but a biohacking group in California has managed to develop eye drops that temporarily give a human being excellent night vision. The chemicals used are still very much at the experimental stage – this isn't something you'd want to try at home just yet – but the first trial has been a successful one.  Read More

The technique uses satellite radar imagery to observe ground displacement, giving research...

Researchers from the University of Iowa and United States Geographical Survey (USGS) have developed a method of using satellite and GPS data to characterize earthquake fault lines in real time, helping to deliver aid more accurately and with greater speed than current systems allow.  Read More

Galaxy cluster MACS J0416.1–2403 with dark matter map (Image: NASA/ESA)

The majority of the universe is made up of mysterious, practically invisible dark matter. But new research is beginning to help us understand it, and seems to indicate that it could be even "darker" than previously thought.  Read More

A metallic nanocoating derived from a virus of the tobacco plant could lead to more effici...

Researchers at at Drexel University have developed a metallic nanocoating derived from a virus of the tobacco plant that could lead to more efficient steam production, improving the performance of steam turbines, air conditioning and electronics cooling systems.  Read More

A new tandem silicon-perovskite monolithic solar cell could achieve high performance while...

By combining silicon solar cells with their cheap and efficient perovskite-based counterparts, researchers at Stanford and MIT are creating a new type of "tandem cell" that could reach efficiencies up to 35 percent.  Read More

Geophysicists have stumbled across what is believed to be the largest asteroid impact zone...

Geophysicists conducting drilling as part of geothermal research claim to have stumbled across the largest asteroid impact zone ever found on Earth. Covering a 400 km (249 mi) wide area in Central Australia, the two ancient craters are believed to be the result of a single meteorite that split in two moments before crashing into the Earth.  Read More

The new material utilizes the same protein that squids use to change color (Photo: Shutter...

We've already heard about two different studies in which scientists are developing camouflage systems inspired by squids' color-changing skin. If they're successful, the result could be military clothing that can change its coloration to match the environment. It's an intriguing idea, although it presumably still wouldn't allow soldiers to avoid detection by infrared cameras at night. Now, however, researchers from the University of California at Irvine are developed a stick-on covering that could let them do so.  Read More

A slight change to the production process could result in chocolate that is both healthier...

Good news if you're hooked on chocolate. Researchers from Ghent University in Belgium and the University of Ghana have developed a new technique for making chocolate that results in it being both healthier and more flavorful. The technique differs from conventional chocolate production in that cacao beans are roasted at a lower temperature and bean pods are left unopened for five days rather than split open right away. It is expected to be particularly useful in countries where cacao beans have less natural flavor and antioxidant activity.  Read More

While gecko feet utilize hair-like fibers, the new material uses similar manmade microscop...

In various types of manufacturing, parts are robotically picked and placed using graspers or suction cups. The former can damage fragile items, however, while the latter won't work in vacuums or on rough surfaces. That's why scientists from Germany's Leibniz Institute for New Materials (INM) have developed – well, a new material. It utilizes the same principle as sticky gecko feet, but its gripping quality can be switched on and off as needed.  Read More

The team manually identified buildings, using them as examples to train the software to wo...

A team of MIT scientists has developed software capable of analyzing existing satellite imagery to identify separate structures, significantly speeding up the process of deciding where to apportion aid in rural areas in the developing world. The system will be tested against existing methods on a project in India.  Read More

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