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Salomon's hands-free water bottle gloves for runners

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August 29, 2012

The Sense Hydro S Lab straps a 250-ml flask of water to your wrist

The Sense Hydro S Lab straps a 250-ml flask of water to your wrist

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It seems that the problem of carrying water is really nagging runners. At least it's nagging manufacturers that want to sell new gear to runners. The numerous running-specific hydration packs and belts already on the market are being joined by alternatives like the Kenmark Armband Water Bottle and now these water-lugging "gloves" from Salomon.

Salomon wagers that it isn't the weight or feel of a water bottle in hand that hinders runners, but the muscle function involved in wrapping your fingers around it and holding it. The recently announced Sense Hydro S-Lab Set is a fancy way of saying "water bottle gloves." We call them gloves, but they're really more like wrist straps that hold included 250-ml (8.5 oz.) soft-sided bottles on your hands. They come in a pair, so you can carry a full 500 ml (16.9 oz) of water with you, assuming you don't mind having one on each hand. The water bottles can roll up as you drink, preventing sloshing and cutting down on size. Salomon also mentions that you can use 150-ml (5 oz) bottles.

Salomon claims that by not having to actively hold the water bottles, you save energy and focus for the run ahead. We're not entirely sure how much energy you really expend on holding a bottle, but when you're on a long, hot, exhausting run, every little bit may just help.

To make a pair of Sense Hydro S-Labs more than a one-trick pony, Salomon includes a terry cloth back, good for wiping perspiration from your brow. The palm is mesh, and an elastic band secures it to your wrist.

The Sense Hydro S-Lab Set will be available within the next few months for around US$40.

Source: Salomon via The GearCaster

About the Author
C.C. Weiss Upon graduating college with a poli sci degree, Chris toiled in the political world for several years. Realizing he was better off making cynical comments from afar than actually getting involved in all that mess, he turned away from matters of government and news to cover the things that really matter: outdoor recreation, cool cars, technology, wild gadgets and all forms of other toys. He's happily following the wisdom of his father who told him that if you find something you love to do, it won't really be work.   All articles by C.C. Weiss
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5 Comments

I run long and ultra distances regularly, the type of runs that would require you to bring your own water. I cannot think that this can be comfortable in the least. You should generally avoid having any weight whatsoever in your hands, especially if it's only the one hand due, to the impact it has on balance.

Though Solomons might be correct in saying it's the muscle function involved with holding it in your hand, I say buy a decent Cambelbak and avoid the issue all together!

Otiose
30th August, 2012 @ 01:28 am PDT

I orienteer. I've already got a compass on my thumb, a SportIdent RFID dibber on one finger, a map in my hand, a control description holder on my forearm, a Forerunner GPS watch on one wrist and a sweatband on the other. I'd also like to carry a small (250ml would be ideal) amount of water with me but camelbaks tend to be too heavy and awkward out in the forest.

I don't know that this would be the answer but I would be willing to swap out the sweatband and give it a go.

Arapito
30th August, 2012 @ 07:17 pm PDT

not sure, but I think a fuel belt would do the same thing....and your hands are free. I would never use something like this product. I run Ironmans and this would just be in my way.

Mark McGraw
2nd September, 2012 @ 05:07 pm PDT

Interesting concept, wondering if anyone's tried it yet?

BTW Mark - you don't "run Ironmans", you run 26.2.

thepenismightier
10th December, 2012 @ 04:48 pm PST

I run long distance, and generally prefer handhelds, though I do have both a Camelbak hydration pack and a small UltrAspire Race Vest which will carry a single bottle on the front.

I do find that gripping a full 500ml bottle is tiring, so I use a Camelbak Quick Grip, a kind of strap which holds the bottle in position in your hand.This allows the fingers and thumb to relax, and you don't lose the bottle if you take a tumble.

I'd like to take a look at these when they hit the (UK) shops, but first impressions are that they seem a little clumsy, especially as a pair, and are too small for me. I think it may be difficult to roll one bottle up when you have one on the other hand.

Dave Johnson
1st January, 2013 @ 11:33 am PST
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