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Roller Buggy – the baby stroller/scooter hybrid for kids on the fast track

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May 19, 2010

Roller Buggy – the baby stroller/scooter hybrid for kids on the fast track

Roller Buggy – the baby stroller/scooter hybrid for kids on the fast track

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Being a single, childless (as far as I know), male my experience with baby strollers is largely limited to trying to avoid parents using them as battering rams at my local shopping center. That task could get a whole lot tougher if the Roller Buggy gains widespread popularity. A simple pull of the lower body extends a platform and transforms the Roller Buggy from a run-of-the-mill baby stroller into a scooter that lets parents transport baby around town at breakneck (hopefully not literally) speed.

Before the cries of “won’t somebody think of the children!” ring out, we should point out the Roller Buggy features a specially-made hydraulic brake system with two disc brakes to slow and bring the buggy to a stop. However, you’ll want to ensure junior is strapped in using the buggy’s safety belt lest your little bundle of joy is sent flying when you slam on the brakes.

It is recommended only for children older than 1.5 years (I’m in) and speeds should be kept below 15 km/h (9.3 mph) – which might be difficult when traveling down particularly steep hills. Depending on the driver, the Roller Buggy will either have the child in the baby seat giggling with joy or screaming in horror. It almost seems like a child bicycle helmet should be sold with this contraption.

It could be seen as irresponsible parenting or a hell of a lot of fun (for the driver at least), but that still doesn’t explain why the Roller Buggy was awarded third prize at the 11th International Bicycle Design Competition in Taiwan. Although, the baby seat can also be removed so the device can be used solely as a scooter.

Designed by Valentin Vodev of PIXSTUDIO, the Roller Buggy is constructed from aluminum, plastic and rubber and weighs in at 20kg (44lb), with dimensions of (HxWxD) 90 x 60 x 90cm (2.9 x 1.9 x 2.9ft). So far only a prototype has been built, so parents looking to turn their child into an adrenalin junkie will have to find another method for the time being.

Via babyology.

About the Author
Darren Quick Darren's love of technology started in primary school with a Nintendo Game & Watch Donkey Kong (still functioning) and a Commodore VIC 20 computer (not still functioning). In high school he upgraded to a 286 PC, and he's been following Moore's law ever since. This love of technology continued through a number of university courses and crappy jobs until 2008, when his interests found a home at Gizmag.   All articles by Darren Quick
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6 Comments

The major problem with it is experts have known for many years now that the ideal stroller or buggy is one that lets the child see the parent that's pushing it. It results in many fewer crying kids.

rdinning
19th May, 2010 @ 08:26 am PDT

Now, a nice fuel-injected aluminum block engine with quick shifting 6-speed transmission, some all-weather performance rubber, and make that 4-wheel disc braking (Brembo, perhaps?), a nice windshield, fairing, safety harness...

Um.

Did I just design a car?

heldmyw
19th May, 2010 @ 01:08 pm PDT

Just add battery power option for another innovation...

gthunder77
20th May, 2010 @ 12:20 am PDT

Oh great so baby gets to be the bumper bar! Ouch. Can you imagine the consequences of a pranged pram at that speed. Baby wants a crash helmet.

Wesley Bruce
20th May, 2010 @ 07:59 am PDT

Oh no, I have images in my head of my son screaming to my partner "GO FASTER DADDY!" and not one of them having the sense to curb the impulse to go really fast down hills.

But hey, looks like it can have a car seat click into it, thats pretty cool, a total travel system, fun for the whole family ;)

Rachel Stewart
25th May, 2010 @ 06:49 pm PDT

The weels are too small.

jochair
29th July, 2013 @ 02:58 am PDT
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