The trend lately in electric skateboards has been to go smaller and lighter – the Sk8-Booster drive, the Stary board, the Bolt, and on and on. Slovenia's Revoll has different ideas. Its C1N electric longboard does feature carbon fiber construction, but it isn't gunning for the title of "lightest" or "smallest." Instead, the dual-motor, dual-battery board promises a fast ride and long range.

Revoll set out to make a cutting edge electric longboard, and judging it by what we know, it seems like it's done it. The deck is built from 100 percent carbon fiber, offering its unique blend of low weight and rigidity. A set of anodized aluminum trucks holds the DTC 80-mm wheels in place. Power comes from individual 2,000-watt electric motors at each rear wheel. It may not be the world's lightest electric board, but at 15.4 lb (7 kg) with single battery, it's not overly cumbersome, either.

According to Revoll's estimates, the dual-motor drive packs enough juice to send the board rolling to 31 mph+ (50 km/h+). That may only be about half the speed that Revoll's countrymen over at NGV got out of their Nextboard when setting a world record last October, but the C1N is quite fast for a standard retail board. It beats other zippy boards claiming to be the fastest out there, including the Marbel (25 mph/40 km/h) and Gnarboard (28 mph/45 km/h).

The C1N isn't just a speed demon's board, either. The base-level board comes with a single 199 Wh lithium-polymer battery, which gives it about 12.5 miles (20 km) of range. That range compares pretty well to the the aforementioned competition – Stary (10 miles/16 km), Bolt (7.5 miles/12 km) and Marbel (16 miles/26 km). The notable exception is the Gnarboard, which is specced at up to 21 miles/34 km for "commuter version."

What's more is that the C1N is designed to accommodate two batteries, so those that spring for both will double their range to around 25 miles (40 km). That's a pretty nice option for anyone that wants to use the e-board for serious around-town commuting.

To help C1N riders manage the board's blend of speed and range, Revoll includes three distinct drive modes. Adrenaline junkies looking to unleash the board's full speed potential will likely dial it to "max power" mode and leave it there. Those that want to use battery power for range over speed can choose "long distance" mode to limit motor output for better efficiency. The custom mode lets the rider set specific max speed and torque figures to create a more personalized blend of speed and range.

The rider triggers acceleration with the handheld controller and slows down by flicking the trigger the other way. The controller includes an LCD screen for displaying information like speed, battery status, range and driving mode.

Assuming Revoll's estimates hold up, the C1N should prove a very solid performer. Revoll tells us that it's finishing up board testing now and plans to have it market-ready by May. It is taking pre-orders, with prices starting at €3,000 (approx. US$3,300) for the base board with one battery.

Source: Revoll