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Recon Instruments goes on tour with limited Pilot Edition Jet sunglasses

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June 27, 2013

Recon Instruments' Pilot Edition sunglasses will come loaded with applications aimed at cy...

Recon Instruments' Pilot Edition sunglasses will come loaded with applications aimed at cyclists, runners and triathletes

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To highlight the potential of its Recon Jet for cycling, Recon Instruments is marking the Tour de France by launching the Pilot Edition of its high tech sunglasses. While the glasses won’t ship until sometime “before the end of the year,” early birds can shave US$100 off the regular pre-sale price by pre-ordering before the end of the Tour de France.

Like the regular model, the limited Pilot Edition packs a 1 GHz dual core ARM Cortex-A9 processor, dedicated graphics, 1 GHz of RAM, 8 GB of flash memory, Wi-Fi 802.11a/b/g/n, ANT+, Bluetooth 4.0 for connecting to iPhones and Android smartphones, GPS, HD camera and on-board sensors measuring speed, distance, elevation gain and ambient temperature. But the Pilot Edition will also come loaded with applications aimed at cyclists, runners and triathletes and ship several months before the regular model.

Users will be able to monitor various stats and performance data collected from the on-board sensors and wirelessly connected third party devices via the glasses’ 16:9 WQVGA display that Recon claims delivers a virtual image equivalent to a 30-inch HD display viewed from a distance of 7 ft (2 m). The device is controlled via an optical touch sensor that registers input even when wearing gloves.

Recon states a battery life of four to six hours depending on use, with the ability to swap out the battery for longer sessions.

Until July 21st, which is the final day of the Tour de France, the Jet Pilot Edition can be pre-ordered for $499. After this date, the price will revert to $599 for the standard model.

Source: Recon Instruments

About the Author
Darren Quick Darren's love of technology started in primary school with a Nintendo Game & Watch Donkey Kong (still functioning) and a Commodore VIC 20 computer (not still functioning). In high school he upgraded to a 286 PC, and he's been following Moore's law ever since. This love of technology continued through a number of university courses and crappy jobs until 2008, when his interests found a home at Gizmag.   All articles by Darren Quick
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